Brooklyn Boro

November 15: ON THIS DAY in 1940, city of Coventry wiped out

November 15, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1915, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Dr. Booker T. Washington, leader of the negro race in America, and president of the Tuskegee Institute, at Tuskegee, Alabama, died yesterday from hardening of the arteries at his home, near the institute, only a few hours after arriving there from New York City, where he had been under treatment in St. Luke’s Hospital all last week … His funeral will be held on Wednesday morning from Tuskegee Institute, the school for negroes which he founded, and for which he worked with unflagging zeal during all of his active career … Dr. Washington was born a slave on the plantation of a family named Burrows, at Hale’s Ford, Virginia, probably in April, 1958. He did not know the exact date of his birth, for in those days records were seldom kept of the birth of slave children, and all he knew about it was what he could gather from hearsay in after years.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1925, the Eagle reported, “The new Madison Square Garden, which is being constructed at 8th Ave. and 50th St., Manhattan, is rapidly nearing completion, and plans for the grand opening have been completed. The initial event will serve to reintroduce ice hockey to the New York public, after a lapse of some years, and will bring together the 1925 world’s champions, the Canadiens of Montreal, and the newly assembled team representing the New York Hockey Club, in an international match. This opening game will be held on Dec. 15 and will be a benefit for the Neurological Institute … The New York Hockey Club will be a member of the seven-club international league which will include representatives of Ottawa, which won the world’s championship in 1920, 1921 and 1923; Montreal, Toronto, the Canadiens of Montreal, who won the world’s championship in 1925; Boston and Pittsburgh.”

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1940, the Eagle reported, “Coventry, England (U.P.) — Squadron after squadron of German airplanes dive-bombed this ancient industrial city for 10 1/2 hours in an attack which ended early today, leaving at least 1,000 casualties and wrecking the town as thoroughly as an earthquake. The survivors of the Nazi air fury today wandered through broken streets and row after row of houses and buildings shattered to matchwood and rubble by the explosion of thousands of bombs. The history of this present day industrial center of 167,000 population dates back to a medieval past brightened by the famous ride of Lady Godiva clad only in her golden hair. Coventry is 85 miles southwest of London.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “Tokyo (U.P.) —  U.S. Marines reached the shores of the Chosin power reservoir — one of the great prizes of the North Korean campaign — yesterday, to find that its Chinese defenders had fled. But the Chinese were striking back hard in the west, forcing the South Korean 8th Division into a four-mile retreat. A motorized patrol of the Marine 7th Regiment, led by Regimental Comm. Col. Homer L. Litzenberg, Jr. of Philadelphia, reached the shores of the Chosin at 4 p.m. (2 a.m. Brooklyn time), and a half hour later troops began scrambling onto high ground commanding the southern tip of the artificial lake. ‘We’ve come a long way to look at this,’ said Litzenberg, pointing across the reservoir … The Chosin, supplying the bulk of North Korea’s hydroelectric power, had been defended bitterly by the Chinese, apparently to give them time to dismantle the power equipment. The Marines several days ago overran heavy crates of equipment the Chinese had not had time to remove.”

***


ON NOV. 17, 1863, the Eagle reported, “Washington — The President will leave here at noon on Wednesday for Gettysburg, so as to enable him to be there on Thursday morning early, without fail. While there he will be the guest of D. Wills, Esq. He will be accompanied by his accomplished private secretary, J.G. Nicolay, Esq. It is requested by the Marshal-in-Chief of the Gettysburg demonstration on the 19th instant, that the governors of the several states will recommend that on that day the American flag be hoisted on all public buildings in the states. It is hoped that the general government will take action in the matter.”


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment