Brooklyn Boro

November 1: ON THIS DAY in 1948, all straws point to Dewey victory

November 1, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Elevated railroad service was crippled today throughout Brooklyn, the Fourth Ave. subway service was hampered, and nearly all trolley lines were suffering from congestion in a marked degree, following the strike order of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers which went into effect at 5 o’clock this morning and which called from work all the B.R.T. elevated and subway motormen and motor switchmen affiliated with the order. At 10 o’clock this morning, L.G. Griffing, assistant grand chief of the brotherhood, and W.J. Orr, one of its organizers, claimed that 350 men were actually out on strike and that their number was being added to hourly … ‘We are in this strike to win and we are positive that we can beat the B.R.T.,’ said Assistant Grand Chie Griffing. ‘You will find in a very short time that our ranks will be augmented to the point where the B.R.T. will have but a handful of men left to operate its trains,’ said organizer Orr.” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1938, the Eagle reported, “Baltimore (AP) — A bright sun tempered a chilly Northwest breeze today as the racing clans turned out by the thousands to see War Admiral and Seabiscuit decide the turf championship of America in a mile and three-sixteenths duel at historic Pimlico. The brown loam racing strip never was better, furnishing perfect footing for War Admiral, 4-year-old son of Man o’ War, from Samuel D. Riddle’s stable, and his 5-year-old West Coast rival, owned by Charles S. Howard of San Francisco. Since both horses are averse to running in the mud, conditions of the race called for a fast track. At 8:30 this morning, Jarvis Spencer Jr., chairman of the Maryland Racing Commission, went through the formality of declaring the race officially on at 3:50 p.m. Three hours before the two were scheduled to face starter George Cassidy up at the head of the stretch, all of the unreserved sections were filled and thousands stood on the lawn or on the grassy infield. Officials of the track expected a crowd of 45,000, exceeding Pimlico’s previous largest of 40,000 that saw Omaha win the Preakness in 1935.”

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DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “(UP) — Polls and political surveys agreed almost unanimously today that for the first time in 20 years, the voters will elect a Republican to be president of the United States. Voting booths will begin to open with tomorrow’s sunrise. From 47,000,000 to 50,000,000 votes are expected to be cast, but nearly half the nation’s potential voters will stay away. The Republican Party seems assured of maintaining its control of the House of Representatives with a reduced majority. Continued Republican control of the Senate is in doubt … Governor [Thomas] Dewey, Republican candidate for president, and Governor Earl Warren, for vice president, will be on the air at 9 p.m. over all major networks. President [Harry] Truman, Democratic candidate, and Senator Alben W. Barkley, his running mate, will be on the air at 10:30 p.m. … Short of war or some domestic catastrophe today, nothing much could happen now to change the outcome of this campaign and election.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “Frankenstein Castle, Germany (U.P.) — Eight intrepid American soldiers settled down in this gloomy 13th century castle tonight to await the Frankenstein ghost that walks on Halloween. ‘We’re ready for him if he comes,’ said 23-year-old Pvt. Thomas Pickens of Yonkers, N.Y., who organized the vigil after studying up on the Frankensteins and their monster. He pointed to the group’s three ‘secret weapons’ as ample guards against the ghost of the man-eating monster. They were three dreamy-eyed St. Bernard puppies named K.P., Eight Ball and Goof Off, and two monkeys, George and Georgette. ‘They’re all mascots of our outfit – Company G, 18th Infantry regiment,” said Pickens. The eight GIs are stationed at Aschafenburg, 25 miles from this twin-towered castle, a cross-covered ruin honeycombed with tunnels and secret passages located on a lonely hilltop near Eberstadt. ‘I didn’t even know there was a real Frankenstein castle until last year,’ Pickens said.”


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