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October 25: ON THIS DAY in 1962, college students protest nation’s Cuban policy

October 25, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1940, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Washington (AP) — President [Franklin] Roosevelt today announced the promotion of Col. Benjamin O. Davis to become the first Negro general in the army’s history. Davis’ elevation, to be a brigadier general, was among a number of high rank promotions which Mr. Roosevelt said were required by the increase of the army. Maj. Gen. Delos C. Emmons, commander of the G.H.Q. air force, was promoted to the rank of lieutenant general, the same rank held by commanders of the army corps.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “The Yankees will have to win the American League pennant and the World Series next year without the services of their new pitching star, Whitey Ford. It was Ford who got ’em into the series this Fall by winning nine [consecutive] games. Now he’s in the service of his Uncle Sam. But the Bronx Bombers are a team that overcomes all obstacles. Nobody thought they would win either in 1949 or 1950, but they fought through to victory each campaign.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1962, the Eagle reported, “Students on several American college campuses have demonstrated against the nation’s Cuban policy. But some of the groups encountered opposition from collegians who approve the quarantine. University of Wisconsin students passed out handbills which called President Kennedy’s actions a ‘bellicose, unilateral act.’ The Wisconsin students said they were from two organizations – the Socialist Club and Students for Peace & Disarmament. Students from Michigan’s Wayne State University joined other demonstrators in Detroit yesterday carrying signs that said, ‘Hands Off Cuba’ and ‘There Are Alternatives to War.’ They said they were members of the Student Peace Union, Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy and the Women’s International League for Peace & Freedom. But their picketing attracted other students, also from Wayne State, carrying signs that said, ‘JFK We’re With You,’ and ‘To Hell with Fidel.’ Some members of this group said they were members of the Young Democratic Club and others said they were Young Republicans.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1962, the Eagle also reported, “Two timely new films are on the theater screens. ‘We’ll Bury You!’ at the RKO Albee in Brooklyn and two theaters in Manhattan, Forum 47th and the 72nd St. Playhouse, and other theaters, could hardly be timelier, considering the current crisis in Cuba. It’s a film record of Communist aggression over the years. ‘The Manchurian Candidate,’ at the Kingsway in Brooklyn and the Astor and Trans-Lux 85th St. in Manhattan and other theaters in the Greater New York area tells the story of a Communist plot to seize control of the U.S.A. through forcing obedience of a brainwashed Korean War hero. ‘We’ll Bury You’ takes its title from Khrushchev’s threat to the U.S.A., uttered some months ago … Shown are such recent historical episodes as Castro’s seizure of Cuba and the escapes and attempted escapes from East Germany over the Berlin Wall. The brutal Red tactics that destroyed the Hungarian revolution, the mass murders, the infamous slave labor camps and the long list of shocking events that have terrorized Europe for years are shown in these revealing films … ‘The Manchurian Candidate’ stars Frank Sinatra, Lawrence Harvey and Janet Leigh.”

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ON OCT. 27, 1868, the Eagle reported, “Little Women — Boston: Roberts Brothers — is Louisa M. Alcott’s story of ‘Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy.’ Miss Alcott is a graceful and effective writer, whose philosophy is genial, and whose views of life are wholesome. Those who have read her hospital sketches will be interested in meeting her in other scenes. In the last paragraph of this book, there is a half promise of a sequel: ‘So grouped the curtain falls upon Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy. Whether it ever rises again depends upon the reception given to the first act of the domestic drama called ‘Little Women.’ The volume is illustrated by May Alcott.”


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