Brooklyn Boro

October 21: ON THIS DAY in 1954, Ike in surprise tour of boro

October 21, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1845, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “A Great Match at Base Ball. — This afternoon, at 2 o’clock, the New York Base Ball Club play a match at ball with the Brooklyn Club at the Elysian Fields, Hoboken. The interest attached to this match will attract large numbers from this and the neighboring city.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1923, the Eagle reported, “A life-sized granite statue of Harmhab, commander-in-chief of the armies of King Tutankhamen, is a new addition to the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It is said by museum authorities to be the finest of their respective types obtainable. Mr. and Mrs. V. Everit Macy, the former a trustee of the museum, presented the funds with which the statue was purchased in Cairo last winter. It had been dug previously from the ruins of Memphis, where from the 18th dynasty (1355 B.C.) it had stood to one side of the gate to the city. It is the seated likeness of the man who was virtually dictator of Egypt during the reign of Tutankhamen, the youthful pharaoh, whose tomb at Luxor was opened last spring and who succeeded him to the throne … The statue is regarded as having a special significance in the light of its close relation with contemporary relics taken from the earth in the recent discoveries of Lord Carnarvon’s expedition this year.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “London (U.P.) — Royal heralds in medieval tunics of gold and scarlet trumpeted a fanfare today, and a wide-eyed girl fidgeting on a small oak and plush throne was presented to the British Empire as its next ruler. Princess Elizabeth made her debut as heiress apparent to the throne at the ceremonious opening of a new session of Parliament. She sat at the King’s right hand. Only the heir to the throne does that on this occasion. The last to do so was the Prince of Wales, in the closing years of the reign of George V.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “The last major source of beer in New York City vanished today when Ballantine Brewery of Newark, which made some deliveries yesterday in the face of the brewery drivers’ strike, decided to suspend operations. The decision to halt all deliveries of bottled, keg and canned beer was revealed by a Ballantine spokesman who said that the firm was quitting the city field ‘before someone gets hurt.’ The suspension probably would hold until the end of the wildcat walkout, it was said. The spokesman said Ballantine drivers were engaged in several fist fights yesterday during their delivery attempts and that there was ‘slight damage’ to trucks. A survey today indicated that the only deliveries being made in Brooklyn were from Pennsylvania and upstate breweries. There were very few of these and, although police offered protection to all who attempted shipments, not many calls were received by authorities. Army beer, however, was going through. Six Trommers trailer trucks from the plant in Orange, N.J., came to the Brooklyn Army Base today with canned beer for troops overseas and the delivery was made without any interference.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “President [Dwight] Eisenhower urged 3,000 Republican campaign workers to put more ‘heart’ into their efforts, then made a surprise hand-waving motor tour that took him through parts of Brooklyn, Manhattan and the Bronx. It was Mr. Eisenhower’s first visit to Brooklyn since his election to the presidency. Obviously out to steam up the local G.O.P. drive, the president told cheering party followers at Republican state campaign headquarters in the Hotel Roosevelt that ‘heart is the one basic ingredient in battle, the thing within a man or an organization that will not accept defeat.’ He warned that the ‘task’ of creating ‘honest, efficient government’ at home and ‘security for the whole free world’ has ‘only just begun.’”


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