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September 30: ON THIS DAY in 1938, Britain, Germany vow never to fight again

September 30, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1843, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The Madisonian says that Professor [Samuel] Morse is about to commence laying the wires of his electric telegraph on the Baltimore and Washington Railroad. The wires are to be protected by leading tubes, in which they are enclosed. They are about the size of a man’s finger in circumference, and the bore is about a quarter of an inch in diameter.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1912, the Eagle reported, “The School of Journalism of Columbia University has opened with the full number of students — about 100 —  the university can accommodate until the completion of the building now under construction at Broadway and 116th Street, Manhattan. A number of Brooklyn and Long Island men are among those who have regularly registered. There are a few students in Columbia College and Extension Teaching who have not yet fulfilled the entrance requirements for the School of Journalism but are allowed to take a few courses in it in the hope that they will make good their regular standing by the end of the year.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1938, the Eagle reported, “Munich, Germany (UP) —  A historic four-power agreement for the cession of Czechoslovakia’s Sudetenland to Germany was sealed today by a British-German pledge to work jointly for the peace of Europe and a decision ‘never to go to war with one another again.’ Formal agreement to the plan was announced by the Czech government in Prague. Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, for Great Britain, and Fuehrer Adolf Hitler, for Germany, agreed to use consultative methods to settle any future disputes, promised to continue efforts to consolidate Europe’s peace, and said in a joint statement: ‘We, the German Fuehrer and the British Prime Minister, have had a further meeting today and are agreed in recognizing that the question of Anglo-German relations is of the first importance for the future of our countries and Europe.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “Nuernberg (U.P.) — The International War Crimes Tribunal today pronounced Nazi Germany guilty of ruthless, aggressive war against 11 countries and stripped the 21 Nazi defendants of their last hopes for acquittal. The tribunal declared the German high command, Reich Cabinet and brown-shirted S.A. Stormtroopers innocent of criminality as organizations. It found the Gestapo, the S.S. and its S.D. security police component and parts of the Nazi leadership corps to be criminal groups. Justices of Russia, Frances, the United States and Britain castigated the Nazi system in relentless terms . It was clear none of the 21 men in the dock would escape death or a prison term … The 21 gray and broken defendants who once swaggered across Europe behind Adolf Hitler sat intently as the justices droned through the 250-page judgment, estimated to run 75,000 words. Some were extremely tense, others glum. Once Herman Goering and Rudolf Hess laughed. But only for a second.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “San Francisco (U.P.) — Mrs. Iva Toguri D’Aquino planned today a fight to overturn her conviction for treason as the Tokyo Rose who broadcast to American troops during the war. Her attorney, Wayne M. Collins, said he would file a motion in the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for an arrest of judgment and a new trial. If those motions failed, Collins planned a direct appeal on grounds that Federal Judge Michael J. Roche instructed the jury improperly and on other technicalities involving admission of evidence. ‘I can’t understand it, I can’t understand it,’ the 33-year-old Los Angeles-born defendant muttered in a shocked voice last night as the jury of six men and six women brought back their verdict after deliberating four days to close the longest treason trial in the nation’s history. The jury found her guilty of one of eight counts of treason. Roche told the weeping defendant to return to court Thursday, Oct. 6 for sentencing. The minimum sentence is five years in prison and a $10,000 or a maximum of death.”


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