Brooklyn Boro

September 19: ON THIS DAY in 1934, Lindbergh kidnap ‘break’ impends

September 20, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1881, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “James A. Garfield, the twentieth president of the United States, died last night at Long Branch of a wound received on the 2nd of July last, in the city of Washington, at the hands of an assassin named Guiteau. In this event three things are seen: A villainous blow at popular liberty; a strange mockery of human foresight and ambition; and a tragedy as pathetic as any that has ever shocked the affections of men. Liberty is stricken, in that popular support and general loyalty seem to afford no guarantee for the security of a ruler beyond what tyranny may devise. The mockery, the irony of fate, lies in the evidence that the best ordered career and the noblest exertions may be blighted on the eve of consummation by the adventure of a worthless knave, or the chance stroke of a rabid madman. What the tragedy is hardly needs description. Not only have we the sudden sacrifice of an innocent life, which is tragedy in essence, but that rarer form of bloody intervention which appears when the victim falls, while the cup of the highest facility is in his hands, and lives for a time to wring devoted hearts with the spectacle of suffering which they cannot diminish.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1901, the Eagle reported, “Washington — President [Theodore] Roosevelt today formally assumed the duties of his new office, presiding over the first regular meeting of his Cabinet. At 11 o’clock, he and the members of his official family gathered in the Cabinet Room of the Executive Mansion. It was an impressive scene. The young president, seated at the head of the long table, looked almost boyish in the presence of the gray-haired men about him. President Roosevelt is the junior by a number of years of every member of the Cabinet, and his young, vigorous and athletic appearance and actions contrasted strongly with the calm and deliberative manner, indicating years of experience, of his advisers … At the Cabinet meeting, President Roosevelt occupied the chair long occupied by his predecessor. It all seemed strange to these devoted advisers of the dead president to sit at the table without him at its head, and the gloom and solemnity which characterized the meeting was not unbefitting the occasion.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1934, the Eagle reported, “Washington (AP) — Department of Justice officials said today ‘hot’ leads had been unearthed in the government’s investigation of the Lindbergh kidnaping case. Attorney General Cummings would not deny or confirm reports that important developments were expected in the case. In answer to a question as to whether the abductors of the famous aviator’s son had been arrested, he said, ‘I wish it were true.’ William Stanley, assistant to the attorney general, however, said: ‘The case is hot. There are three phases to it and if anything should go wrong with them it would be tragic. I’m sorry, that’s all I can tell you now.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “Brooklyn’s parade and Borough Hall reception celebrating the Brooklyn Dodgers pennant victory, originally scheduled for Tuesday, has been canceled so the team may be in ‘peak condition’ to meet the Yankees in the World Series. Walter F. O’Malley, president of the club, announced the change in plans. He said: ‘The Borough Hall reception to the 1953 National League champion Brooklyn Dodgers, which was planned for Tuesday, has been canceled. Manager [Charlie] Dressen and I are determined that the team be in peak condition for the World Series. A parade on a day when a game is scheduled would deprive the team of pre-game batting and infield practice. Borough President [John] Cashmore’s enthusiasm for a great civic demonstration is deeply appreciated by the Dodgers but we have prevailed on him to respect our wishes.’”

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