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September 13: ON THIS DAY in 1940, king escapes bomb shower

September 13, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1879, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle also reported, “London — The Times, in a leading editorial article, says: ‘Nothing is known up to the present time to confirm the rumors of a general rising in Afghanistan. We are justified in believing that the condition of the country has become no worse since the first outbreak.’ The Press Association announces that the home government telegraphed to the Viceroy of India, last night, expressing approval and gratification at his military arrangements. The political department of the India office here considers it extremely probable that Herat, Badakhshan and Balkh will support the revolt, but has no definite news on the subject. The very absence of news from those districts is accepted as evidence that the country beyond Cabul is practically in the hands of the Heratic troops, which is considered exceedingly probable. The government may have to exercise military intervention in the affairs of Burmah.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1879, the Eagle also reported, “Buffalo — The American Union Telegraph Company’s workmen reached this city yesterday, and in placing their wires met with considerable obstruction from the Western Union Company’s men. The American Union Company had placed poles sixty-five feet high, which would make their wires from five to ten feet above those of the Western Union. The latter company attempted to place poles higher than those of the former, but they fell short, and in the melee which ensued, one of the Western Union men cut the wires of the opposition company. At two o’clock this morning, the American Union men had got their wires about strung, thereby giving them the advantage, but the Western Union party were still hard at work to circumvent them. At that hour it was raining quite hard. Considerable excitement attends the conflict.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1901, the Eagle published a letter to the editor which stated, “In this hour of dreadful suspense, with the life of our dear President [William McKinley] wavering because of the assassin’s bullet, I am convinced that we should put about our chief executive a better guard for his personal safety, and I am prompted to propose a radical change in our laws governing penalties to those of anarchistic tendencies. I propose that the penalty for attempt on the President of the United States be death, and that the penalty be enforced by the same military law that governs with such promptness on the battlefield in case of treason. I propose that the detective force be made a substantial bodyguard, to travel where he goes, and that they be given authority to make search of any and all persons in his presence, at any and all times.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1940, the Eagle reported, “London — German warplanes bombed Buckingham Palace and Downing Street today in unprecedented daylight attacks that for the first time almost paralyzed London life and aroused British fears of a deliberate offensive to drive the King and government from the capital. A Nazi bomber diving at Buckingham Palace dropped five explosives and a shower of incendiary bombs, but King George and Queen Elizabeth, in an underground shelter, escaped injury. Three plumbers working on the south wing were slightly injured, craters were dug in the ground and the royal chapel was wrecked. Other incendiary bombs were showered over Downing Street — residence of Prime Minister Winston Churchill and site of the Foreign Office, Treasury and other government buildings — and nearby areas.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “Portland, Me. (U.P.) — Maine voted today in the first election of this presidential year. The voters may elect the first woman Republican ever voted a full term in the U.S. Senate. Mindful of the adage that ‘as Maine goes, so goes the nation,’ Republicans and Democrats alike hoped the state election, which included congressional contests, would furnish ammunition for the presidential campaign. The voting was highlighted by the campaign of Representative Margaret Chase Smith, who hoped to become the first woman of her party ever elected to a six-year term in the Senate. Democrats admitted they did not expect to win any major office in this traditionally Republican state.”

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