Brooklyn Boro

September 5: ON THIS DAY in 1946, nation-wide ship strike

September 5, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1882, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “For the great labor parade in New York this morning the arrangements were admirably made. That it would prove to be a most imposing turnout had been confidently predicted, but that such a multitude of workmen would present themselves in marching was surprising even to those most active in promoting the demonstration. There was no confusion or disorder. Brooklyn, Newark, Jersey City, Hoboken, Paterson and other places contributed to the first division, as did that portion of the city below Canal Street … Almost every branch of labor represented had decided to make a day of it. Piano makers, cigar makers, cloth cutters, cabinet makers, bricklayers and those who work at a dozen other trades had agreed upon so complete a suspension of operations that nearly every manufactory in the city was closed.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1901, the Eagle reported, “Buffalo — President’s Day at the Pan-American Exposition dawned bright and clear, with temperature sufficiently low to make the day all that could be desired. It was evident from the crowds on the streets early in the morning that the attendance would be large. Business houses and private residences were gaily decorated with flags and bunting, and banners were stretched from windows and across streets, bearing words of welcome to the president and expressive of the sentiment which the great fair is designed to foster: ‘Peace to Pan-America.’ … Promptly at 10 o’clock, the president emerged from the home of Mr. Milburn, Mrs. McKinley accompanying him, walking by his side without assistance. A great burst of cheers greeted them, which the president acknowledged by bowing and raising his hat … A president’s salute of twenty-one guns was fired. The president was at once escorted to the stand erected in the Esplanade. What was probably the greatest crowd that has assembled on the Esplanade greeted Mr. McKinley.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1929, the Eagle reported, “Publication of the new 14th edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica was announced today, and according to the announcement it’s a bigger and better and more tremendously astounding Encyclopedia Britannica than ever. Despite the name, the encyclopedia is now under American ownership, and the statistics issued by the publication office indicate, in the best American statistical tradition, that nothing like this has ever seen the light of print before. There are 24 volumes in the new Britannica and there are 1,000 pages in each. The complete text has more than 35,000,000 words – count ’em if you doubt it — written by more than 3,500 authors … It is the first complete revision since 1911 and the third since the Civil War.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “The biggest maritime tie-up in the country’s history was under way today as two A.F.L. unions called out 65,000 seamen in a strike against a Wage Stabilization Board ruling against a negotiated pay increase. All in all, some 500,000 maritime workers were affected, their ranks including C.I.O. unions which have pledged their support to the walkout. The action in New York Harbor hit 310 American ships and paralyzed industrial activities on some 300 piers in the metropolitan area. In Brooklyn the total volume of shipping is about 25 percent of the entire port area, according to an estimate by a spokesman of the Port of New York Authority. According to authority figures, there are 204 piers in the harbor section, 58 of them in Brooklyn. The industrial paralysis at the borough’s waterfront, already present because of the trucking strike, was now made complete by the shipping walkout.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “Rio de Janeiro, Sept. 5 (U.P.) — President [Harry] Truman said today the United States is determined to support the United Nations with ‘all the resources at our command,’ but warned it will take steadfastness of purpose, unremitting toil and infinite patience to make the U.N. work. Mr. Truman, speaking to a joint session of the Brazilian Congress, said the nations of the Western Hemisphere have demonstrated to the world that right-thinking men can submerge their ‘individual prejudice and their individual aims’ to an agreement that will bring ‘great benefit’ to the world.”


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