Brooklyn Boro

August 27: ON THIS DAY in 1926, riotous crowds give Ederle wildest welcome

August 27, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1911, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “A cloud of winged ants struck the Bedford and Bushwick sections last night and made life miserable for about everybody on the streets. The air seemed filled with the insects. Motormen on trolley cars suffered perhaps as much as any one class of individuals. The ants — there were millions of them — invaded restaurants and other business places with open doors. They proved to be real pests. Nobody was able to explain where they came from or give any reason for the sudden invasion.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “With exercises of great impressiveness, including addresses by noted public men, an elaborate musical program, the firing of a salute by warships in the harbor and airplanes circling the spot, the monument which is the gift of Charles H. Higgins and will stand as a memorial to the heroes who took part in the Battle of Long Island is being unveiled at Greenwood this afternoon. The Altar of Liberty, as it is called, is a heroic bronze figure of Minerva, standing beside an altar of granite, the four sides of which are decorated with bronze plates carrying historical and commemorative inscriptions. The statue is the work of a Brooklyn sculptor, F. Wellington Ruckstull, and is a masterpiece. United States Senator William M. Calder, who was one of the speakers, called attention to the importance of the battle in our history as the first great conflict of the struggle for independence. In part he said: “The Battle of Long Island did not bring immediate success to the colonies, but in the final result it was as important as any engagement fought during that long conflict, for it brought out in true light the character of the American soldier.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1926, the Eagle reported, “New York went mad today over a girl. Nothing like the welcome to Gertrude Ederle, first woman to swim the English Channel, has happened before in this city. The receptions accorded to Lieutenant Commander Byrd, who flew over the North Pole, faded into insignificance in comparison. Even that accorded General Pershing did not arouse the tremendous popular acclaim accorded to this 19-year-old girl whose courage and endurance have made her an international heroine. Fifty launches, tugs and river craft roared a welcome as the Berengaria emerged out of the fog of the Narrows at 11 o’clock, two circling airplanes swooped low and dropped wreaths of flowers on the water, fireboats shot their water salutes and a great cheer such as the harbor has never heard before greeted the girl in the blue hat, who stood beside her father, waving an American flag from the lower deck.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1928, the Eagle reported from Paris, “Representatives of 15 leading nations of the world today signed the Kellogg-Briand treaty renouncing war as an instrument of national policy and condemning recourse to war for the solution of international difficulties … The first to sign the historic document was Dr. Gustav Stresemann, German Foreign Minister, who attached his signature at 3:45 p.m. (10:45 a.m. New York time). Then followed, in turn, Secretary of State Kellogg of the United States and 13 others, ending with Foreign Minister Benes of Czechoslovakia.” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1930, an Eagle editorial stated, “Other movie actors have got their names into the household vocabulary and others have founded their fortunes on their faces, but none in quite the same way as Lon Chaney. His death cuts short a career that sailed right against the breeze of the traditions of his profession. Except in one or two parts, no one ever saw Lon Chaney act a part on the screen; the part was there but Chaney was not to be seen … As the Man with a Thousand Faces we shall vividly remember him. Also as the man with a thousand figures and personalities. His protean gift will no doubt inspire imitators. By their performances we shall know whether he simply possessed a peculiar gift not communicable to others or, rather, originated a new source of entertainment in which later comers might replace him.”


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