Brooklyn Boro

August 23: ON THIS DAY in 1944, Paris freed

August 23, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “A list of investors in the [Charles] Ponzi scheme — persons who trusted in the ability of the overnight financier to make riches for them in a month or two — looked like a cross section of the community when it was printed today. All walks of life were there — men and women of the professions, of business and of labor. It is estimated that thirty thousand in all placed their money in the scheme which is now in receivership and of these about one-half withdrew it with or without the 50 percent interest which Ponzi paid before the crash. The others are relying on federal receivers to recover what is left.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1926, the Eagle reported, “Rudolph Valentino is dead! Death occurred at 12:10 o’clock, Eastern daylight time, in the Polyclinic Hospital, Manhattan, where eight days ago the man familiarly known to millions as Rudy underwent a double operation for gastric ulcers and appendicitis … The word brings sadness into many homes all over the world, for the dark-eyed young man with the winning smile was regarded as the most popular man of his type on the screen … Valentino died as he lived, in a pitiless glare of publicity. At the hour of his death, police reserves had been called to handle the great crowds milling around the Polyclinic Hospital, where the dying man lay on the eighth floor in suite Q, guarded day and night by detectives. During the eight days following his operation, a score or more newspaper men and women were on constant watch in the press room downstairs. Thousands of telephone messages, hundreds of floral offerings and other gifts poured in on the hospital, one little cabaret singer who ‘knew him when’ even bringing all she had, a pet monkey, to cheer the great sheik of the films.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1935, the Eagle reported, “Dazzy Vance, veteran right-handed pitcher, was today unconditionally released by the Dodgers. Vance was signed as a free agent last spring. The Cardinals had turned him loose a few days before he signed his Dodger contract. Vance was used only as a relief pitcher this season, and his record was three victories against two defeats. He broke into the National League as a member of the Dodgers in 1922 and remained with them until the fall of 1931, when he was traded to the Cardinals … His greatest year was in 1924 when he won 28 games. He led the National League in strikeouts in seven consecutive seasons. In his National League career Vance won 197 games and it was his ambition to register 200 triumphs. He is now 42 years old.” Vance was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1955.

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ON THIS DAY IN 1935, the Eagle also reported, “Washington (AP) —  Budget Bureau officials and the President’s Economic Security Committee estimated today that 10,000 persons will be employed to administer the new social security law. The new agency will be ‘one of the largest in Washington,’ one high-ranking Budget Bureau official said.”

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DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “London, Aug. 23 (UP) — An angry army of French patriots rebelled against their Nazi conquerors and liberated their capital city of Paris today. Striking for their own freedom even as a massive American tank army gathered at the city gates, hundreds of thousands of embattled Partisans stormed Nazi barricades, overwhelmed the enemy garrisons and hoisted the tri-color triumphantly over the city. First word of the patriotic blow came in a dramatic announcement from Gen. Pierre Koenig, commander in chief of the French Forces of the Interior, that insurrection had been raging through the capital since early Saturday morning when the call for a general uprising was flashed to the underground in Paris … In four days street fighting such as the ancient city had not seen since the storming of the Bastille 155 years ago, the ill-armed patriots routed the bulk of the German occupation forces from Paris and slaughtered the doomed rear guards left to cover the Nazi evacuation.”

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