Brooklyn Boro

August 16: ON THIS DAY in 1913, first-of-its-kind Greenpoint hospital approaches completion

August 16, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1903, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Joseph Pulitzer has provided the sum of $2,000,000 to establish a school of journalism at Columbia University, this city. A new building will be erected on Morningside Heights, Manhattan, at a cost of $500,000 for the school, which will hold toward the university a relation similar to that of the other professional schools, such as the law school, the school of medicine and the school of mines, and like them will be national in scope.” It was also reported, “Both Mr. Pulitzer and Columbia University recognize that with the establishment of a school of journalism of university grade a new academic field is entered upon.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1913, the Eagle reported, “The new Greenpoint hospital, which will be one of the finest buildings of its kind in the five boroughs, is nearing completion at Bullion street and Kingsland avenue … It is being erected at a cost of $340,000. Frank J. Helmle of 190 Montague street is the architect, and Albert Winternitz of Manhattan is the contractor. The brick and steel work on the building has been completed, and in a few days the work of finishing the interior will be begun. According to the present rate of progress, the institution should be ready to receive patients before December. The structure is in handsome design, and is built of Indiana sandstone and buff-colored brick. It will be fireproof in every detail; will be supplied with the latest improvements and facilities, and will accommodate more than 400 patients. The building is six stories in height at its central portion and five stories on the two wings. It will be equipped with two electric passenger elevators, one electric service elevator and electric dumbwaiters. Controller Prendergast laid the cornerstone of the building on April 27 of the present year.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1932, the Eagle reported, “Englewood, N.J., Aug. 16 (AP) — Another son was born to the Charles A. Lindberghs today, bringing happiness back to a home long darkened by deepest tragedy. Five months and 16 days after 20-months-old Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr. was stolen from his crib to meet his death while all the world sought him, the second baby was born at 7:30 a.m.” A pioneering aquanaut and cave diver, Jon Lindbergh is 87 years old today.

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “London (U.P.) — Four Hungarian and Czechoslovakian Olympic swimmers who came to London to compete in the Olympic games refused to return to their Communist-dominated homelands today. The Sunday Dispatch said that other iron curtain athletes, including Yugoslavs and Poles, now live at a secret London address and predicted other applications to remain in Britain might be forthcoming from them. The British Broadcasting Company said a fifth athlete, a Hungarian, had announced his intention of remaining but later decided to return home.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Eagle reported, “Tehran, Iran (U.P.) — W. Averell Harriman, U.S. presidential adviser, stepped actively into Anglo-Iranian oil negotiations today to prevent their collapse. Informed sources said he planned meetings with both parties in separate conferences behind closed doors during the day. It was understood Harriman decided to shed his role as an inactive observer when British and Iranian negotiators struck a deadlock in their dispute over nationalization of British oil interests. Harriman was responsible for bringing the two nations together for the present talks when the original negotiations broke down last June. The present deadlock resulted from terms laid before the Iranians Sunday night by Richard Stokes, British delegation chief. Deputy Premier Hussein Fatemi said they were not acceptable.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “Chicago, Aug. 16 (U.P.) — More than 125,000 persons crowded into Chicago’s huge Soldier Field last night to open the World Council of Churches, one of the most important meetings in religious history. The huge ‘Festival of Faith’ under the stars was a solemn and dramatic opening to the worldwide meeting based on the simple theme ‘Christ — the Hope of the World.’ Author of the ‘Festival’ drama is Helen Kromer, who also wrote ‘This City Under God,’ given in February, to mark the 300th anniversary of Brooklyn Protestantism.”

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