Brooklyn Boro

July 2: ON THIS DAY in 1912, Woodrow Wilson nominated for president

July 2, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle

ON THIS DAY IN 1881, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “A telegraphic dispatch received at Elberon states that President [James] Garfield has been shot and probably mortally wounded … The Pennsylvania Railroad has ordered a locomotive and car at Jersey City to carry Mrs. Garfield to Washington. She had arranged to meet her husband at Jersey City today, and left Long Branch this morning on the Central road for Jersey City. The message informing her of the attempted assassination is awaiting her arrival at the latter place.” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1912, the Eagle reported, “Convention Hall, Baltimore, July 2 — Woodrow Wilson of New Jersey was nominated for president by the Democrats today. The breaking of the deadlock, which had continued since 7 o’clock Friday morning, was received with a great demonstration on the part of the delegates. The nomination of Wilson was by acclamation after the forty-sixth ballot had started. Just before the roll call began, [Oscar] Underwood and [Eugene] Foss withdrew, and [Champ] Clark released the delegates who had stood by him. The forty-sixth roll call had not gone far when Congressman [John] Fitzgerald moved that it be suspended and the nomination be made by acclimation, and as soon as order was restored the nomination was made. The climax came in a dramatic manner after Wilson had made tremendous inroads on the Clark and Underwood delegations in the forty-fifth and forty-sixth ballots.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1914, the Eagle reported, “Triest, Austria, July 2 — An imposing demonstration today accompanied the landing here, from the Austrian battleship Viribus Unitis, of the bodies of the assassinated Archduke Francis Ferdinand and his consort, the Duchess of Hohenberg. The entire community thronged the shore or took up positions on board the craft in the harbor at an early hour. The two coffins, shrouded with national flags, were transferred from the battleship to a barge draped with black, which was towed to shore by a tender amid artillery salutes and the tolling of church bells.” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “Howland Island, Oceania, July 2 (U.P.) — Amelia Earhart raced toward this tiny island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean today on the most hazardous lap of her around-the-world flight. Coast Guard and naval authorities stood by here to lend whatever assistance possible to Miss Earhart and her navigator, Capt. Fred Noonan, in bringing the big Lockheed Flying Laboratory safely over the 2,550-mile journey from Lae, New Guinea … George Palmer Putnam said in San Francisco today that the San Francisco Coast Guard radio station contacted his wife’s plane at 5:15 a.m. New York time, but that she did not state her position. Putnam estimated that Miss Earhart had covered half the distance from Lae, New Guinea, to Howland Island. The Associated Press reported that the Coast Guard at San Francisco was advised that a radio contact was made with Amelia Earhart’s plane at 10:18 a.m., E.S.T., by operators at Howland Island. Atmospheric conditions were unsatisfactory for clear radio reception.”

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DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

ON THIS DAY IN 1940, the Eagle reported, “London, July 2 (AP) — The war has upset the royal routine for initiating Princess Elizabeth to public life as heiress presumptive to Britain’s throne. Neither 14-year-old Elizabeth nor her 8-year-old sister, Margaret Rose, is seen in public these war-clouded days. Palace sources say that like England’s other boys and girls, they are ‘somewhere in the country.’ The Princesses’ visits to London are rare, usually short shopping tours and lunches with their parents, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth. Because of air raid hazards, they never stay at Buckingham Palace. In seclusion they are carrying on their usual studies. There are no court functions and fewer ‘extras,’ such as dancing. Elizabeth is said to be studying geography intently and showing keen interest in news of the war. She gave up study of German recently and started Spanish in its place. Both children knit, save tinfoil and are kept to regular food rations.”

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