Brooklyn Boro

July 1: ON THIS DAY in 1934, Hitler forces slay 11 leaders of opposition

July 1, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle

ON THIS DAY IN 1916, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Dallas, Tex., July 1 (On Board Fourteenth New York Infantry Special) — The Fighting Fourteenth crossed the Red River into Texas at 7 o’clock last night, and a wild cheer was given by the Brooklynites with the realization that the long journey was nearing an end. A few minutes later, at Denison, parallel tracks, which ran for a half mile, brought the train bearing the Seventy-first Regiment into view. The Seventy-first is traveling on the ‘Katy’ system, while the Fourteenth’s route lies along the ’Frisco system. As the trains drew together, cheers and greetings were shouted across the intervening space from regiment to regiment until the tracks diverged again. Texas received the Brooklynites with open arms. Four thousand people were out at Sherman to watch the troop trains pass through. Texans say they deeply appreciate the coming of the troops such a long distance to fight for them.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1934, the Eagle reported, “Berlin, June 30 — Ruthless to all opposition, Adolf Hitler today crushed in blood a revolt that threatened his third Reich. Whether the reactionaries of the Right or the radical Nazis of the Left, mutinous leaders were ‘liquidated.’ Kurt von Schleicher, former chancellor, a reactionary who wanted a return to monarchy, was killed by rifle-carrying police when he resisted arrest as a conspirator. Capt. Ernest Rohm, commander of the storm troops, for years Hitler’s closest friend and a Left-wing National Socialist leader, committed suicide. He had been arrested, deposed and expelled from the Nazi party. He was accused of supporting Hitler’s overthrow and indulging in immoral orgies … A communique from Nazi headquarters in Munich said that eight storm troop leaders had been shot to death in connection with the discovery of a conspiracy.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “Aboard the U.S.S. Appalachian in Bikini Lagoon, July 1 (U.P.) — Vice Admiral W.H.P. Blandy disclosed today that three, and possibly four, ships were sunk by the atomic bomb, seven were heavily damaged and about 25 slightly damaged. In his second report on the results of today’s historic test, the director of the $100,000,000 ‘Operation Crossroads’ project revealed that the destroyer Lamson, which was knocked on its side by the blast, was sunk. Blandy also announced that the destroyer Anderson had not been located by advance boarding parties and it is believed she also may have sunk … As the lethal rays left by today’s bomb dissipated, scientific crews entered the target area to report the actual damage and learn the effect of the above water bomb burst on the animals which took the place of men on the target ships. Preparations already were under way for the second part of the $76,000,000 test of atomic bombs vs. navy ships — an underwater burst to see if steel armor can withstand the terrific water pressure.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “Berlin, July 1 (U.P.) — The last symbol of four-power unity in Germany disappeared today as the Russians smashed the Allied Kommandatura, which has ruled Berlin, with announcement that Soviet delegates no longer will attend its meetings. The Russian action, crisply announced at a Kommandatura meeting by Col. Boris Kalinin, the Soviet chief of staff here, appeared to kill the four-power authority for the city of Berlin just as dead as the Russians killed the Allied Control Council for all Germany by their walkout last March. But simultaneously with the new Russian emphasis of the break between Russia and the Western powers, Soviet authorities gave a hint that the starvation blockade of the Western sectors of the German capital might be lifted or erased soon. The contrasting Russian moves came as the greatest peacetime air operation in history was put in high gear by the western powers to feed the 2,500,000 Berliners who live in the American, British and French sectors of Berlin.”

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