Brooklyn Boro

June 14: ON THIS DAY in 1937, senate report blasts F.D.R.’s court bill

June 14, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle

ON THIS DAY IN 1934, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “A red flag waved from the top of the 25-foot Eternal Light pole in Madison Square Park, Manhattan, this morning, and a police emergency squad, a hook and ladder company and a group of patriotically indignant park loungers could not get it down. In the still of the night, the flag had been hoisted and the rope ripped away. A passerby at dawn noticed the flag and notified a policeman. The Park Department was notified to send its electric light repair man, with his scaling apparatus.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “Washington, June 14 (AP) — The Senate Judiciary Committee recommended rejection of the Roosevelt court bill in blistering language today, branding it ‘a needless, futile and utterly dangerous abandonment of Constitutional principle.’ ‘It should be so emphatically rejected that its parallel will never again be presented to the free representatives of the free people of America,’ said the report, signed by seven Democrats and three Republicans. The 10,000-word report echoed virtually all the objections raised to the measure in seven weeks of hearings. It said the bill would not accomplish its purpose, would destroy the independence of the judiciary and would make the government ‘one of men rather than one of law. It contains,’ the majority said, ‘the germ of a system of centralized administration of law that would enable an Executive so minded to send his judges into every judicial district in the land to sit in judgment on controversies between the government and the citizen.’ As the controversial measure finally reached the Senate after more than four months of nationwide debate, administration Senators said they virtually had abandoned its proposal for adding five new judges to the Supreme Court at once.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1938, the Eagle reported, “Thousands of Brooklyn fans who had planned to see the Dodgers meet the Reds this afternoon at Ebbets Field in the first game of a three-game series were disappointed. The Dodgers could not make the field in time because of a breakdown of the locomotive on their train that was carrying them from Grand Rapids, Mich., on the New York Central Line. The breakdown happened about 6 a.m. The train was due at the Grand Central Station at 10 a.m. This postponed game will be played as part of a double-header when the Reds arrive here again next month. But tonight manager Burleigh Grimes will give his players a rehearsal in preparation for the first scheduled night game in the history of Ebbets Field tomorrow night with the Reds.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, Eagle editor and columnist Robert M. Grannis wrote, “Today is Flag Day and a lot of Americans won’t bother to pay any attention to it. Others will explore the attic and drag out the banner which guarantees their freedom. It will be dusty and worn and there will be moth holes here and there but the colors will remain intact. Nothing ever happens to the significance of this emblem and nothing ever will so long as folks retain even an ounce of appreciation. I decided to write about the flag today to answer a neighbor who thinks that nationalism is something to be ashamed of. Personally, I think he is an ass and I hope he reads this.”

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DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

ON JUNE 15, 1963, the Eagle reported, “A contingent of Hollywood stars, led by Troy Donohue, Connie Stevens, Ty Hardin and Diane McBain, will arrive in Boston next Tuesday to be among the honored guests the following evening at the gala world premiere of ‘PT 109,’ the Warner Bros. motion picture about President John F. Kennedy’s adventures as a Navy lieutenant in the South Pacific in World War II. The premiere will take place at Loew’s Orpheum Theatre, with proceeds benefiting leading charities of all faiths.”

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