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June 7: ON THIS DAY in 1944, heavy fighting rages on French beachhead

June 7, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle

ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Vienna, June 7 (AP) — The International Olympic Committee decided unanimously today to hold the 1936 games in Berlin, settling definitely a controversy that has raged over Jewish discrimination in Germany. The committee expressed itself as satisfied that the contests will be carried out in Berlin in the Olympic spirit despite the bans placed on Jewish activity in all branches of German life by Chancellor Hitler.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1939, the Eagle reported, “Supreme Court Justice Joseph Force Crater, who vanished mysteriously in August, 1930, was ruled legally dead yesterday by Surrogate James A. Foley in directing that Crater’s will, leaving an estate of $30,000 to Mrs. Stella M. Kunz, his widow, be admitted to probate. An action in Supreme Court is expected to settle the question of whether the insurance companies are bound by the ruling. The Crater estate consists entirely of insurance. In his decision, Surrogate Foley referred to a Court of Appeals decision holding the right of the courts to pronounce a person legally dead after seven years of unexplained absence.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “Allied Supreme Headquarters, London, June 7 (UP) — Thousands of Allied reinforcements poured into the Normandy peninsula by ship, parachute and glider today to bolster invasion armies which encountered fierce resistance after driving the enemy from the beaches and cutting one of his main lateral supply roads. ‘Satisfactory progress has been made,’ General [Dwight] Eisenhower announced in his third communique of the invasion, but an official spokesman said very heavy fighting was in progress in some sectors. The German air force has rallied from the Allies’ initial stunning blow and has begun to resist the assault under orders to fight to the death if necessary … Front reports confirmed that American, British and Canadian assault troops and tanks — covered and supported by 11,000 planes and 600 warships — had firmly secured their beachheads along a 60-mile stretch of the Normandy coast of northern France between Cherbourg and the mouth of the Seine and were pushing inland.”

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ON JUNE 8, 1884, the Eagle reported, “Mr. F.W. Stanley, F.G.S., has made a microscopic examination of some of the dust that fell upon the deck of the barque Arabella at about 1,000 miles from the Krakatoa before the 28th of August last — that is, two days after the period of the greatest eruption. Mr. Stanley analyzed principally the forms and dimensions of the particles to ascertain their floating and optical properties. He found the dust was formed mainly of pumice, but that this pumice was for the most part of an extremely light kind, or what he terms overblown — that is, that the ordinary air bubbles that are found in pumice were much distended and blown so thin that they appeared to have been burst into fragments.”

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ON JUNE 8, 1919, the Eagle reported, “Sgt. Alvin Cullum York has got the answer he asked for before he entered the Army. Miss Grace Williams and the heroic mountaineer were married at Pall Mall, Tenn., their childhood home, Saturday, June 7. The ceremony was conducted by Gov. Roberts of Tennessee, and 3,000 proud Tennesseans attended … Sgt. York wore the uniform of a colonel on the governor’s staff, the rank recently conferred on him by Gov. Roberts and the Tennessee Legislature. On his breast were the Distinguished Service Cross, the Croix de Guerre with one palm and the Congressional Medal of Honor … Sgt. York had asked the momentous question of his boyhood sweetheart before he left Pall Mall to become the Hun-killer, and his return found her waiting for him with the proper answer. It is difficult to oppose a man who has killed 25 Germans, captured 132 more and put out of commission 35 enemy machine guns.”

 

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