Brooklyn Boro

May 28: ON THIS DAY in 1927, Lindbergh lands his plan in Brussels

May 28, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle

ON THIS DAY IN 1900, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Rear Admiral J.W. Philip, commandant of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, this morning brought to a successful completion his pet scheme of erecting an official flagstaff at the largest, oldest and most important navy yard in the country. The flag was raised a few minutes before 9 o’clock in the presence of naval officials and their wives, a few invited guests and a battalion of marines. This is the first time the local navy yard has had an official flagstaff, although the station is over one hundred years old.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1925, the Eagle reported, “Boulogne-Sur-Mer, France, May 28 (UP) – Miss Gertrude Ederle, champion American woman swimmer and holder of several world’s records, and Miss Lilian Harrison, English swimmer from Argentina, are preparing for the attempts they will make at separate times this summer to swim the English Channel from Cape Gris-Nez, near here, to Dover. Jabez Wolfe, well known English swimmer, who is said to have few equals in knowledge of the English Channel, is at Cape Gris-Nez to arrange for Miss Ederle’s training, which he will supervise. He thinks she should be ready to attempt the channel swim about the end of July, if the weather is good. Miss Lilian Harrison attempted twice to swim the English Channel last year. The first time she injured her leg by slipping on a sharp rock as she entered the water and was forced to abandon the attempt. The second time she was in the water eight hours but gave up because of adverse currents. In 1923 she swam for 21 hours down the Parana River in Brazil and during the same year the Plata River in Argentina.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1927, the Eagle reported, “Brussels, May 28 (AP) – Capt. Charles A. Lindbergh, America’s transatlantic aviator, landed at the Evere Airdrome, Brussels, from Paris at 3:15 o’clock this afternoon … His shining monoplane, the Spirit of St. Louis, was sighted by the great throngs on the field at 3:12 o’clock. It began swooping downward a moment later to land amid a great storm of cheers. He was escorted from the Franco-Belgian border by two Belgian army planes. Trailing him were several other planes which had acted as an escort from Paris … From early morning, the roads leading to the field were lined with persons anxious to get a good place to see the landing. They comprised all classes and traveled in all sorts of conveyances. One boy was seen astride a milk cart, which had been emptied early, drawn by a team of Flemish dogs, making his way leisurely to the airdrome … An old woman, wending her way afoot, picked up by a passing motor, said, ‘My boy was an aviator, too. It is in his memory that I go to Evere to see the American hero.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1930, the Eagle reported, “The Chrysler Building, already a familiar figure on Manhattan’s skyline, was officially opened yesterday. The ceremonies were held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the 42nd St. Property Owners Association in the Hotel Commodore. After a public inspection of the 77-story structure, Walter P. Chrysler was guest of honor at a luncheon at which the speakers were George W. Sweeney, president of the 42nd St. Association; former Governor [Al] Smith and former Assemblyman Martin G. McCue.”

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DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

ON THIS DAY IN 1935, the Eagle reported, “Callander, Ontario, May 28 (AP) – One year ago today Mrs. Oliva Dionne turned a wan, frightened face to the midwife who stood at her bedside, and asked weakly: ‘Were they – triplets?’ ‘Yes, Elzire – and two more.’ Such was the drama of the ramshackle farmhouse on May 28, 1934 that was remembered today with ceremonies, gifts and best wishes – the first birthday anniversary of the Dionne quintuplets. In their parents’ farmhouse, however, there were bitterness and resentment, for the quintuplets – Yvonne, Annette, Cecile, Emile and Marie – have a new, spick and span home across the road, with the flag of England flying before it. They are wards of his majesty the King.”

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