Brooklyn Boro

May 20: ON THIS DAY in 1927, Lindbergh reaches Nova Scotia ahead of schedule

May 20, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle

ON THIS DAY IN 1848, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “There are only 48 prisoners now confined in the Kings County jail, twelve of whom are waiting trial at the next Court of Sessions, which will sit on Monday week, for the following offences, viz, burglary 2; grand larceny 6; assault with intent to kill 1; assault, with intent to ravish 1; bigamy 2. In consequence of the convicts being sent from the justices’ courts directly to the county penitentiary and workhouse, it is thought that there will shortly be rooms to let in the jail.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1883, the Eagle reported, “The Old Brooklynites held a largely attended meeting last evening in the Surrogate’s Court. Mr. John W. Hunter presided and Dr. Watson recorded. Messrs. A.H. Osborn and Stephen Kidder were appointed as a committee to secure a suitable badge to be worn on the day of the opening of the [Brooklyn] bridge. Mr. Joel Conklin said that every member should pay for his badge, as there were a number of members in arrears who, therefore, were not entitled to a badge. A motion was made that every member be given a badge. Mr. Conklin objected, but the motion was adopted. Colonel W.E. Sprague was elected grand marshal, after which the meeting adjourned.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1923, the Eagle reported, “Columbia’s baseball nine swamped Wesleyan yesterday at South Field by the overwhelming score of 15-2. The victory was due largely to [Lou] Gehrig, star Blue and White twirler. Gehrig allowed only three hits. He also did some timely batting. Gehrig started the ball rolling for Columbia in the first inning when he hit his seventh homer of the season, chasing Kennedy in ahead of him. He also singled and was walked twice. The Morningsiders were in rare form, the entire team going on a batting spree for the grand total of 19 hits.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1927, the Eagle reported, “The gray monoplane Spirit of St. Louis, in which Capt. Charles A. Lindbergh started on a reckless non-stop flight to Paris from Roosevelt Field, L.I., at 7:52 a.m. today, passed over Springfield, Nova Scotia at 1:05 p.m., the Associated Press reported. She had by that time gone about 700 miles of her projected 3,600-mile ‘hop,’ moving smoothly and beautifully over the Nova Scotia coast, headed northeast. Thus far the young man from Missouri has been flying, therefore, at the rate of 115 miles an hour, and he reached Nova Scotia ahead of the schedule he had set for himself … In midafternoon all signs were favorable for the success of the captain’s daring adventure. Even the elements extended a friendly hand to ‘Lucky’ Lindbergh. When he made his start, weather reports told of fogs over Newfoundland and generally bad flying conditions on the ‘Banks.’ But later today Navy hydraulic experts reported from Washington that weather prospects were ‘almost perfect’ for crossing the ocean, with an ‘unusual advantage’ in the high pressure area over the Great Circle Route which Lindbergh was taking, though it was here that the gallant Frenchmen, Nungesser and Coli, went astray.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “Michael Curtiz Productions has signed Doris Day, band and supper club songstress, to an exclusive long-term contract. Her first assignment will be a leading role opposite Jack Carson and Oscar Levant in ‘Romance in High C,’ which Warner Bros. will release. Miss Day … was formerly featured vocalist with the bands of Rudy Vallee, Fred Warning and Les Brown.” Day’s debut, renamed “Romance on the High Seas,” was released in June 1948.

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “Edie Adams is studying the finer points of divestiture this week for her role in ‘Love with the Proper Stranger.’ Her teacher is Sally Marr, who teaches all the young strippers signed to star at Hollywood’s Pink Pussy Cat Club. Sally’s real name is Sadie Kitchenberg and her son is Lenny Bruce.”

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