Brooklyn Boro

May 9: ON THIS DAY in 1936, Hidenburg lands after record trip

May 9, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle

ON THIS DAY IN 1924, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The possibility that Brooklyn will have a riverside drive by opening a roadway through Fort Hamilton from Shore Rd. out to Coney Island is expected to develop out of a conference to be held tomorrow between representatives of the War Department, Boro President Riegelmann, Park Commissioner Edward O’Loughlin and Chief Engineer Tuttle. This was made known today by Aldermanic President Murray Hulbert, who discussed it with Secretary Weeks in Washington yesterday. Efforts to this end have been made for the past ten or twelve years.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1936, the Eagle reported, “Brooklyn got up early this morning to wave a welcome to the mammoth Hindenburg. Thousands of persons, including some who had been out all night, were on rooftops and other vantage points when the mighty Zeppelin sailed into view at 5 a.m. Brooklyn was the first land the ship had passed over since leaving Ireland. After flying directly over the borough, the Hindenburg cruised for about 18 minutes over Manhattan, from the Battery to 110th St.. Ship sirens were sounded enthusiastically and searchlights were played on the 803-foot craft. Many who had been sleeping were aroused by the din of the reception and rushed to windows and roofs to wave a welcome. Several hundred greeters were gathered on the roof of the Hotel St. George and traffic in front of the hotel was tied up temporarily when motorists stopped their cars to watch the huge airship.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “Churchill Downs, Louisville, Ky., May 8 (AP) – War Admiral, son of Man o’ War and the favorite, raced to a smashing victory today in the 63rd Kentucky Derby before a crowd of 63,000. War Admiral led from start to finish, beating J.H. Louchheim’s Pompoon by two lengths and Mrs. Ethel V. Mars’ Reaping Reward by five lengths. Charley Kurtsinger, Louisville boy, who rode Twenty Grand to record-breaking triumph in the 1931 Derby, gained his second victory in the good time of 2:03 1-5 for the mile and a quarter. War Admiral, after behaving badly at the post, broke in front and never was headed. Kurtsinger hit the favorite only twice with the whip as they rounded the turn leading into the home stretch and beat off the only challenger, Pompoon. War Admiral paid $5.20 to win for each $2 Mutuel ticket, thus going to the post slightly short of 5 to 2 odds.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “The lifting of the brownout, with the official proclamation of VE-Day restoring city night lighting to almost normal, today brought indications that other wartime restrictions may soon be removed. The midnight curfew and the racing ban are expected to be lifted soon. Kept in varying degrees of darkness for more than three years, theater marquees, advertising signs and store windows blazed throughout the city last night. The highlight of the brownout lifting in the city was the illumination of the Statue of Liberty with greatly added power to her torch. Except for 15 minutes on D-Day, the harbor beacon had been only dimly lighted since Pearl Harbor.”

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DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “Birmingham, Ala. (UPI) – Negro leaders yesterday called a halt to their anti-segregation demonstrations in this racially torn city ‘because we believe there are honest attempts at a settlement.’ ‘We feel the possibility looms that a settlement might come within the next 24 hours,’ Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth told a joint news conference. The Negro leaders said they did not want to discuss terms of the truce at this time. ‘We want to be honest and fair .. we do not want to jeopardize anything,’ they said. ‘All we can say is that those we are negotiating with are the leading business and industrial men in the city,’ the two said. A morning-long meeting of the bi-racial group preceded the announcement.”

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