April 26: ON THIS DAY in 1923, Albert, Duke of York married Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon

April 26, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle Staff

ON THIS DAY IN 1881, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Funeral services were held this afternoon over the remains of Tunis G. Bergen, at his late residence, in the Town of New Utrecht. The old homestead was thronged with friends of the deceased, among whom were many of the oldest residents of Brooklyn and the country towns. The mourners included nearly all of Mr. Bergen’s neighbors, and before the services began they joined in hearty testimony to his many excellent qualities. Many of the people from the city were conveyed to the Bergen house by carriages from the corner of Bay Ridge and Third avenue. The services were brief, simple and impressive, and occupied less than an hour. [Brooklyn] Mayor [James] Howell was present.”
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ON THIS DAY IN 1914, the Eagle reported, “Washington, April 25 – Pan-American diplomacy tonight made its first attempt to solve the Mexican crisis by peaceful negotiations. The United States government accepted from Argentina, Brazil and Chile a formal offer to act as intermediaries in the present situation, but reservedly pointed out that any act of aggression by the military forces or hostile demonstrations toward Americans might upset hopes of immediate peace. Coincidentally with the acceptance of the offer of mediation, administration officials announced there would be no cessation of preparation by the army and the navy for future emergencies, and no orders would be issued to the naval forces at Vera Cruz, or the ships at sea, changing original plans. No further steps, however, to secure reparation for the indignities which gave rise to the present situation will be attempted while the effort is being made to bring about a settlement through diplomacy.”
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ON THIS DAY IN 1923, the Eagle reported, “London, April 26 (AP) – Albert, Duke of York, was united in marriage with Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon in solemn old Westminster Abbey at noon today with a pomp and panoply reminiscent of the days of the mid-Victorian era and amid the tumultuous demonstrations of the vast throngs that gathered under threatening skies to witness the wedding pageant. As the cortege entered the Abbey, a slight drizzle of rain fell, but soon afterward the sun broke through the clouds and as the royal pair made their exit they were greeted with brilliant sunshine, recalling the old saying ‘Happy is the bride the sun shines on.’”
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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “London, April 26 (U.P.) – Two Red armies tightened their encirclement of Berlin today and stormed Tempelhof Airdrome, last avenue of escape for Nazi bigwigs trapped with perhaps 500,000 German troops in the doomed capital. A Moscow dispatch said Tempelhof had been ‘virtually overrun,’ denying the Nazis the prospect of escape even by air. The German radio continued to insist Adolf Hitler and other top Nazis, including Propaganda Minister Paul Joseph Goebbels and Reichsmarshal Herman Goering, still were in the burning, embattled city.”
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ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “’It was at eleven that a delirium of joy and thanksgiving swept over humanity…’ Mrs. Esther Scholnick, mother of 11 children, eight of whom served in World War II, stood silently as the words of the American Legion’s 11 o’clock ritual were spoken last night at the sixth annual ball and entertainment of Maurice G. Jones Post in the Biltmore Ballroom, 2230 Church Ave. Her heart was full. It was one of the happiest moments of her life. From former Deputy Controller Milton Solomon, a past county commander of the Legion, she had just received the ‘Certificate of Merit.’ It was the Legion’s way of honoring Mrs. Scholnick and her husband, Louis, whose ‘eight valiant sons’ are now continuing their service to the community as Legionnaires. All eight were recruited by Post Commander William Panessa and inducted in November. Jones Post is the only one in the country with eight brothers as members. Somewhere in Kansas there’s a Legion post with five brothers. ‘I’m deeply touched, my heart is failing,’ said Mrs. Scholnick as she accepted the award.”

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