April 25: ON THIS DAY in 1947, novelist Willa Cather died

April 25, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle Staff

ON THIS DAY IN 1886, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Paris, April 24 – A stock company with a large capital has been organized for the purpose of erecting the tallest tower ever seen in the world in time for the International Exposition of 1889. The tower is to have a total height of 984 feet and will be supported on four pillars higher than the steeple of Notre Dame. The whole structure will cost $208,000. It will be surmounted by a group of electric lights, which will illuminate all Paris, and will, it is estimated, be visible at Dijon, 197 miles distant.”
***
ON THIS DAY IN 1915, the Eagle reported, “Tiflis, Transcaucasia, April 23 (via Petrograd and London) – A telegram received here from Dyadin, a town near Bayazid, in Turkish Armenia, dated April 21, relates that twenty-three men have arrived there from Arzish-Kaleh and Suckham, near Lake Van, in Turkish Armenia. They bring a recital of the shooting and the massacring by the police, on orders received from the Turkish authorities, of local Armenians. These twenty-three men succeeded in escaping. The Turks have told the people about the clashes between Armenians and Mussulmans in Van, and particularly the massacres of Armenians. The Armenians of Arzish-Kaleh and Suckham have been called upon to provide supplies and assistance for the great number of refugees it is expected will come from the Vilayet of Van.”
***
ON THIS DAY IN 1937, an Eagle political columnist wrote, “The victory of Lyndon Johnson, newly elected House member from San Antonio, is being advertised as a triumph for the president’s court proposal. On the surface it was; but many astute Texas authorities suspect Johnson’s popularity as head of the national youth movement there would have afforded him a victory regardless of the position he took on the court plan.”
***
ON THIS DAY IN 1938, the Eagle reported, “Lou Gehrig continues to slump. Old Rawhide has made but one hit since the season opened. He has been in slumps before, but this is the worst ever. From the stands it appears as though Lou is out of physical condition. His underpinning is weak. Three times during the Washington series he was thrown out when he should have made the base easily.”
***
ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “London, April 25 (U.P.) – British Lancasters attacked Hitler’s Berchtesgaden hideout with six-ton earthquake bombs today, and American reconnaissance pilots said fires still were burning close to it more than four hours later. There was no indication whether Hitler was at his mountain retreat when the R.A.F.’s biggest bombers struck at it for the first time, possibly in an attempt on the Fuehrer’s life. Intense antiaircraft fire from the batteries around Berchtesgaden led some observers to speculate that Hitler was there. The Nazis, however, have insisted he is directing the defense of Berlin. There are three primary targets in the Berchtesgaden area: Hitler’s country home; the SS barracks on the grounds, and Hitler’s mountain retreat, about five miles from the country home and called ‘The Eagle’s Nest.’”
***
ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “Willa Sibert Cather, one of America’s outstanding novelists, whose story ‘One of Ours’ won the Pulitzer Prize in 1922, died yesterday afternoon at her home, 570 Park Ave., Manhattan. She was 70. Miss Cather was born on a farm near Winchester, Va., her ancestors having come from England, Ireland and Alsace. Her family moved to Nebraska when she was 8 and she was graduated from the University of Nebraska in 1895. For a while she taught school and did newspaper work in Pittsburgh, Pa., and each summer visited in Nebraska, Colorado and Wyoming. In the meanwhile she had started writing, and her first published work was a volume of verse, ‘April Twilights.’ Most of her stories had their setting in the West. They were noted chiefly for their simplicity and charm of manner, and the accurate picture they gave of home life on the prairies. Her early books included ‘My Antonia’ and ‘O Pioneers.’”

Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment