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April 19: ON THIS DAY in 1912, Brooklyn flags at half mast for Titanic

April 19, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle

ON THIS DAY IN 1852, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin. This beautiful and instructive book, which is now in everybody’s hands, or soon will be, struggled into existence under the following circumstances, as we learn from the Eve. Post – ‘Dr. Bailey, of the National Era, enclosed one hundred dollars in a note to Mrs. [Harriet Beecher] Stowe one day, with a request that she would send him as good a story for the Era as she could afford to write for that amount. After the lapse of some weeks, a few sheets of Uncle Tom’s Cabin were forwarded to the doctor, and in due season appeared in the Era. The following week more sheets arrived and were published. The story grew on her hands, and expanded as she progressed, and instead of being a tale of ordinary magazine dimensions, as was anticipated, it swelled to the proportions of a two volume novel, and instead of being closed in a month, it has been a most attractive feature in the Era every week for more than a year.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1854, the Eagle reported, “Madame Tussaud, the Jarley of London, has added to her other curiosities the veritable guillotine which severed the heads of Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette, and a hecatomb of other revolutionary sacrifices. It was purchased of a man by the name of Samson, who had it, as an heirloom, from his father, the celebrated revolutionary Jack Ketch.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1903, the Eagle reported, “Eagle Bureau, 53 Rue Cambon –  Paris ought to be in sackcloth and ashes this week for its sins, but there is no evidence, or almost none, that it is. To be sure, there is rather more than the usual activity about the churches, but that is all. And yet it is the one week in the year when the most callous unbeliever reflects a little upon the religion into which he was born and whose influence molded his early years, and if he is not altogether hardened he goes occasionally into a church for a brief prayer, or, perhaps, he goes to listen to one of the Lenten sermons … Travelers generally like to go to the Madeleine for any special service, for the music is better than at Notre Dame. In fact, the services there are often rather disappointing, notwithstanding the beauty of the architecture and the sentiment connected with it. It is, of course, the Cathedral of Paris and is always referred to by the Parisian as the Cathedral and not as Notre Dame, but the parish connected with it is neither wealthy or important, and people always go to their own parish church here.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1912, the Eagle reported, “Borough President Alfred E. Steers issued orders this morning directing that the flags on every municipal and borough building in Brooklyn be placed at half mast immediately, on account of the Titanic disaster, and to remain so displayed until further notice. Simultaneously with the borough president’s order, a like direction was sent out from Fire Headquarters on Jay Street. Mr. Steers, through the newspapers, today requests that every citizen in the borough display flags at half-mast and leave them so until the flag on the Borough Hall is again hauled to the peak.”

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News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “Everything’s all right now – the Dodgers have bought Chuck Connors as first base insurance from their Montreal farmhands. The Mighty Kevin recited his version of ‘Casey at the Bat’ last night with new gusto at the Knothole Club dinner at the Hotel St. George but he has no intention of playing Casey on the ball field … Like Tommy Brown and Cal Abrams, he’s a Brooklyn boy, although he migrated to Seton Hall, over in New Jersey, for his college education. Brown is a graduate of the Parade Grounds and Abrams prepared for his pro baseball career at four Brooklyn high schools – Lafayette, Abraham Lincoln, New Utrecht and James Madison.”

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