Brooklyn Boro

April 12: ON THIS DAY in 1951, Truman vows all-out fight for F.D.R. aims

April 12, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle

ON THIS DAY IN 1865, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Brooklyn has been in a state of gunpowder for about a week. Cannon have been continually reminding us of victory and coming peace. Last evening a salute of one hundred guns was fired from Washington Park and one hundred guns were also fired from the Heights in honor of the victories in Virginia, and the capitulation of Gen. Lee.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1911, the Eagle reported, “Damery, Department of Marne, France, April 12 – The ‘champagne’ riots, which began in this department yesterday, were continued this morning by the excited populace. Wine cellars are being destroyed and the disorder is spreading in spite of the presence of troops called out to preserve order. The trouble in this department began yesterday, on the receipt of news from Paris that the Senate had passed a resolution in favor of the suppression of all territorial delimitations of the area in which wine can legally be designated as champagne. Seven thousand wine growers left here this morning, marching on to Epernay, four miles distant, to destroy the wine cellars there.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “Hyde Park, April 12 (U.P.) – President [Harry] Truman, solemnly observing the first anniversary of the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt, today pledged his administration to a continuing fight for the foreign and domestic policies of his predecessor. The Missourian who was projected into the nation’s highest office by the sudden death of Mr. Roosevelt at Warm Springs, Ga., a year ago today indorsed in its entirety his former chieftain’s program in these words: ‘In the aftermath of a global war, the overall task is difficult. But it can be simply stated: it is to carry forward the underlying principles and policies, foreign and domestic, of Franklin D. Roosevelt. Changes may be required here and there to meet changing conditions. Fundamentally the objectives are the same.” Speaking as the government took formal title to the Hyde Park house where Mr. Roosevelt was born, and near which he was buried, Mr. Truman told his small but distinguished audience that ‘we are determined to fight with all our strength’ for the ‘principles of international cooperation’ laid down by the late president. ‘We are determined to do all within our power to make the United Nations a strong living organization, to find effective means of alleviating suffering and distress, to deal fairly with all nations,’ he said.”

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ON APRIL 13, 1843, the Eagle reported, “Today the city of New York celebrates officially, and most appropriately, the centennial anniversary of the birthday of Thomas Jefferson – the great Apostle of Liberty and the Friend of Man. While we write, flags are waving from the public buildings, and the shipping is gorgeously decorated with streamers, though such is the stillness and ‘ethereal mildness’ of the atmosphere that they are rather disposed to droop lazily at their masts than to fly and flutter. By and by the roar of the cannon will be heard, and the sounds of martial music will greet the ears of such as are rambling on the Heights in quest of health, or loafing round the docks.”

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ON APRIL 14, 1940, the Eagle reported, “Toronto, April 13 – The Rangers won the Stanley Cup tonight, defeating the Leafs, 3 to 2, in overtime. The Rangers, trailing by 2-0 going into the third period, came from behind. The victory gave them the series, four games to two.”

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ON APRIL 14, 1944, the Eagle reported, “Frank Sinatra faced the most critical audience in the world yesterday at Ebbets Field – Dodger fans. They liked the way the crooner wore his Brooklyn baseball cap at the mike. They joined heartily in the chorus of Frank’s first song, ‘Take Me Out to the Ballgame.’ But when he turned to the love songs, the crowd began to chant in contempt, ‘We want Crosby! We want Crosby! We want Crosby!’”

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