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December 13: ON THIS DAY in 1950, tens of thousands of troops withdrawn from Korea

December 13, 2018 Brooklyn Daily Eagle

ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “Tokyo, Dec. 14 (U.P.) – Thousands of United Nations troops poured aboard transports in Hungnam Harbor for the third day yesterday under intermittent attack by Chinese Communists who have forced their evacuation by sea from northeast Korea. The evacuation of all 60,000 U.N. troops in the northeast began Monday, when 20,000 Marines and Army troops fought their way out of a Chinese Communist trap near the Chosin Reservoir. News reports of the withdrawal were suppressed two days at the request of Gen. Douglas MacArthur’s headquarters. In western Korea, all ‘non-essential’ persons and equipment were being removed from Seoul while the U.S. 8th Army guarded the South Korean capital’s approaches. Chinese Communists in American uniforms hit the U.N. defense line around the Hamhung-Hungnam beachhead Wednesday but were beaten off and chased back by U.S. 3rd Division troops.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1860, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “A movement is on foot, it is said, in this day of secession, to form a new State, to be composed of New York City, Kings, Queens, Suffolk, Richmond and Westchester counties, to be called the State of Manhattan. Mayor [Fernando] Wood is said to be the originator of the scheme.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1876, the Eagle continued its coverage of the devastating fire at the Brooklyn Theater the previous week, writing, “The heartless conduct of the young woman who, ‘just for fun,’ went to the morgue last week and had one of the bodies there marked for identification as that of her brother, cannot be too severely condemned. The morbid desire to play the role of martyr is strongly developed in many young persons, but it is rarely that so deliberate and criminal an act will be committed by even an adult, only from mere wantonness. Not a few persons whose imaginations are more uncontrolled than they should be have since the fire made assertions of having been there, and merely for the sake of a temporary importance have deliberately lent themselves to falsehood.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1897, the Eagle reported, “Consolidation Celebration. — A meeting of the celebration committee appointed at the mayors’ meeting at Delmonico’s, New York, last Thursday night, will be held this afternoon in Mayor [William] Strong’s office. Secretary W.F. King called on Mayor Strong this morning and made arrangements for the meeting. A preliminary draft of the arrangements for the celebration has been made and a large number of letters from persons interested in the movement have been received. It is understood that Mr. [Chauncey] Depew is to be one of the orators at the celebration.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1902, the Eagle reported, “The date of the third Wetzler symphony concert at Carnegie Hall has been changed from January 6 to Saturday evening, January 3. The orchestra has been augmented to 110 players and Mme. Schumann-Heink will be the soloist. A feature of special interest will be Richard Strauss’ tone poem, ‘Also Sprach Zarathustra,’ this being its first performance by a New York orchestra.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “An inch of rainfall reported in upstate watershed areas may add 5,000,000,000 gallons to the city’s reservoirs, providing a five-day supply – if the public can cut its consumption to 1,000,000,000 gallons a day, Water Supply Commissioner Stephen J. Carney said today. Carney warned that the rainfall, which continued lightly today, was still just a drop in the bucket compared to the city’s needs. Meanwhile, operators of 16 Brooklyn auto laundries were weighing an ultimatum from Carney that they either shut down completely or have their water shut off. The laundries announced, through signs, that they will resume car-washing on a three-day-a-week basis, Thursday morning. Carney replied that if they do their water will be ‘peremptorily shut off.’ This would entail breaking through the pavement outside each of the laundries.”

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