Brooklyn Boro

December 6, ON THIS DAY IN 1941, Reds Claim Nazi Rout on 3 MOSCOW FRONTS

December 6, 2018 Brooklyn Daily Eagle

SLAVERY WAS ABOLISHED ON THIS DAY IN 1865. The 13th Amendment abolished slavery in the U.S. on this day, stating, “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, save as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”

 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1867, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The enthusiasm over Dickens’ appearance in Boston is unabated. The gentleman gave his third reading last evening at Tremont Temple, and introduced to his audience portions of ‘Nicholas Nickelby,’ and ‘Boots at the Holly Tree Inn.’ His hearers were composed of that fashionable portion of the people of Boston, who are seldom seen at the theatres and shows. Richly attired young ladies, accompanied by their gallant beaux or their papas or mamas, were charmed by Dickens, the older people were delighted, and all were more than satisfied. The temple was crowded as upon the two previous occasions of Mr. Dickens’s appearance. The readings were characteristically excellent, and given in the author’s best style.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1876, the Eagle reported, “The Catastrophe. This is a black-letter day in Brooklyn. The theatre named for and worthy of the city caught fire last night, and its interior parts were consumed. Could chronicle stop here — as it did in the morning papers and as it was thought it truthfully could — the community would only contemplate a considerable and easily reparable private loss. But the material misfortune is the least and is wholly eclipsed in the horrors of the holocaust which later intelligence reveals to have occurred. The hourly increasing chapters of that holocaust have been given in successive extra editions of the Eagle today. The completed and dreadful volume of destruction is presented with this impression. It is a saddening, fearful, most calamitous story which fills the eyes and darkens the homes of the people of Brooklyn, and deposits hundreds of dead within the walls of as many families, whose sorrow becomes, by the right of sympathy, the sorrow of every heart in the town.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1930, the Eagle reported, “San Francisco, Dec. 6 (AP) — Philo T. Farnsworth, youthful inventor of San Francisco, today announced he had discovered a way of transmitting images on a narrow band of radio frequencies. Farnsworth said his discovery would multiply by about 40 the number of channels available for broadcasting television pictures. This announcement was supplemented by his statement that the principle evolved would make possible the use of the new process for telephotoing pictures on the same wires used for the transmission of news by applying inexpensive attachments to the teletype printers now generally utilized.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1941, the Eagle reported, “Tokio, Dec. 6 (U.P.) — Japan renewed bitter attacks on the United States through officially approved statements today, declaring that efforts of ‘hostile powers’ to hamper creation of a new order in East Asia would be repulsed and that the next move for war or peace was up to President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill. ‘We Japanese are tensely watching whether Mr. Roosevelt and Mr. Churchill commit the epochal crime of further extending world upheaval,’ Lt. Gen. Teiichi Suzuki, minister without portfolio and president of the Cabinet Planning Board, told a meeting of the East Asia Economic Council. ‘Japan’s patience would no longer be necessary in event the countries hostile to peace in East Asia — countries whose identities are now absolutely clear — attempt to continue to increase disturbances in the Far East.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1942, the Eagle published the following notice: “In Memoriam. FOLEY — In loving memory of my son, First Class Seaman WALTER CHARLES FOLEY, killed Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941. First anniversary mass at 10:45 a.m., Holy Name R.C. Church, Prospect Park West-Prospect Avenue. Loving MOTHER.” Foley, an 18-year-old Brooklynite, died aboard the USS Oklahoma along with 428 other crewmen during the Japanese attack on Hawaii. Last week, the Pentagon announced that his remains had been identified through DNA samples. More than 72,000 service members remain unaccounted for from World War II.