Brooklyn Boro

December 3: ON THIS DAY in 1938, Berlin confines Jews to ghetto

December 3, 2018 Brooklyn Daily Eagle Brooklyn Daily Eagle

ON THIS DAY IN 1938, the Eagle reported, “Berlin, Dec. 3 (AP) — An order by Berlin’s chief of police today revived a medieval practice of forbidding Jews access to certain streets and quarters despite recent assurances of Nazi leaders there was no intention to establish Jewish ghettos in Germany. Henceforth German Jews — those of foreign nationality are exempted from the order — are forbidden to appear on some of the capital’s principal streets, in public buildings, national memorials, theaters and other public places. Jews living in the restricted areas must obtain police permits to enter or leave the districts. Police also canceled the driving licenses of all Jews today and forbade them to drive automobiles anywhere in Germany. The order was issued by Heinrich Himmler, head of the State Police, the United Press said.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1842, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “One of the Lowell representatives to the Massachusetts Legislature received a majority of two votes. Last year, the same gentleman was chosen by a majority of one, and he says the last choice is such a fair evidence of his growing popularity, that they may consider him up for a third term.”  

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ON THIS DAY IN 1852, the Eagle reported, “Some surprise has been expressed at the omission from the text of the Senatus-consultum reestablishing the empire, the clause making Jerome Bonaparte, the only surviving brother of Napoleon, the heir presumptive to the throne in case Louis Napoleon should have no heir. This clause existed in the draft of the Senatus-consultum, as originally proposed, and as, it was supposed, Louis Napoleon desired it should remain. But it was expunged by the Senate very unanimously to the great mortification of Jerome, and some say to the chagrin of the prince president, although there are different theories on this last point. The motive of the exclusion of Jerome is said to have been, not so much an objection to him as to his son Napoleon Bonaparte, who would succeed him, and who is described as a socialist and red republican. Jerome resigned his seat in the Senate immediately on this demonstration adverse to him and his family.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1867, the Eagle reported, “Dickens read ‘A Christmas Carol’ and ‘The Trial Scene from Pickwick,’ in Tremont Temple, Boston, last night. The large hall was crowded, and the audience included the most distinguished people of Boston — and therefore of course the foremost men of all this world. A correspondent describes Dickens’ personality and the peculiarities of his style of acting-reading at some length. The novelist wears a white carnation in his buttonhole, a pink rosebud on his shirt front, a gold stud, much watch chain, and a diamond ring. He does not confine himself to the text, either as originally printed or as condensed for the readings, but ‘gags’ freely, and in a measure adapts his matter to the new locality. The reading last night occupied two hours, and was received with every expression of satisfaction.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1897, the Eagle reported, “There was a large attendance last night at the meeting of the Society of Old Brooklynites, which was held in the Surrogate’s Court room. As this was the last meeting which the society would hold during the existence of this city as an independent community, it was arranged to have a talk on reminiscences of Brooklyn.”