Brooklyn Boro

November 1, ON THIS DAY in 1952, Adlai Stevenson appears at BAM

November 1, 2018 Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Eagle file photo

ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Adlai E. Stevenson headed back home to Illinois today, confident that his appearance at the traditional Friday-before-election rally at the Academy of Music had assured him of another Brooklyn tradition — a landslide in New York’s biggest borough. An overflow crowd of 3,500 persons gave the Democratic Presidential nominee a tremendous welcome at the Academy last night. It was strictly a Democratic audience and it went all out for its candidate as he made his final bid for the state’s vital 45 electoral votes. Stevenson used his only Brooklyn appearance to make his final Eastern attack on Dwight D. Eisenhower, charging that the Republican candidate was an apostle of ‘resurgent isolationism’ in his stand on the Korean War … Although he received an enthusiastic welcome in Brooklyn, crowds outside the Academy of Music and along the streets waiting for his motorcade to pass through the borough after an appearance at Sunnyside Gardens in Long Island City fell short of the expectations of the Brooklyn Democratic organization.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1908, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Rochester, N.Y., Oct. 31 — After a week’s campaigning in New York City and state, which ended here tonight with a duplicate of the rousing demonstrations he has inspired wherever he went, William H. Taft, the Republican presidential candidate, made this statement to the Associated Press: ‘The state of New York is the most Republican part of the United States. Even more Republican than the state of Pennsylvania. There is every indication, through that part of the state above the Bronx that there will be a plurality for the Republican ticket nearly equal to that of Mr. [Theodore] Roosevelt four years ago.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Eagle reported, “The end of the war is very near, in the opinion of Washington. During the past 48 hours there has been such rapid progress toward peace that even [President Woodrow Wilson] finds difficulty in keeping pace with hurrying events, despite the fact that he is largely guiding them. Night before last he was at work until 1 o’clock in his study, receiving dispatches, sending them, and analyzing the swift moves, both political and military. Last night he had little or no rest from his labors. He did not reach his bed until an early hour this morning. He has laid aside everything except the peace situation, and to that he is devoting all the powers of his mind, with all the concentration of which he is capable.

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ON THIS DAY IN 1926, the Eagle reported, “Detroit, Nov. 1 (AP) — Harry Houdini’s mysterious feats of escape, which thrilled spectators throughout the world in his life, today were locked in the mystery of death. The magician, hailed by his fellow workers as the greatest of them all, died here last night, taking with him the secrets of how he escaped from manacles, chains, coffins, straitjackets and other contrivances, performances which no other man ever had duplicated under his challenge. Greatly weakened in health, Houdini left Schenectady for Montreal. On Tuesday, Oct. 19, he addressed a class of students there on spiritualistic tricks, following his lecture with an informal reception, during which he remarked on the unusual strength of his stomach muscles and their ability to withstand hard blows without injury. Without warning, one of the students struck him twice right over the appendix. Houdini suffered no pain at the time, but later, when he boarded a train for Detroit, he complained of feeling ill where he had been struck.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “Frankenstein Castle, Germany, Oct. 31 (U.P.) — Eight intrepid American soldiers settled down in this gloomy 13th Century castle tonight to await the Frankenstein ghost that walks on Halloween. ‘We’re ready for him if he comes,’ said 23-year-old Pvt. Thomas Pickens of Yonkers, N.Y., who organized the vigil after studying up on the Frankensteins and their monster. He pointed to the group’s three ‘secret weapons’ as ample guards against the ghost of the man-eating monster. They were three dreamy-eyed St. Bernard puppies named K.P., Night Ball and Goof Off, and two monkeys, George and Georgette. ‘They’re all mascots of our outfit — Company G, 18th Infantry regiment,’ said Pickens. The eight GIs are stationed at Aschafenburg, 25 miles from this twin-towered castle … ‘I didn’t even know there was a real Frankenstein castle until last year,’ Pickens said. ‘But it’s true. It was built in 1252 by the Frankenstein family. The monster legend came later.’”