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October 11, ON THIS DAY in 1937, Supreme Court rejects challenged to Justice Hugo Black

October 11, 2018 Brooklyn Daily Eagle
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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Washington, Oct. 11 (AP) — The Supreme Court rejected today two petitions challenging Justice Hugo L. Black’s eligibility to hold a seat on the high bench. The court denied motions by Albert Levitt, former federal judge in the Virgin Islands, and Patrick Henry Kelly, Boston attorney, who asked the court to determine Black’s legal qualifications for the post … Neither the Kelly nor Levitt motion made any reference to charges of Ku Klux Klan membership which furnished the basis for principal Senate attacks on Black’s appointment and caused a storm of controversy before he finally took his seat. To the charges, Black said in a radio speech to the nation that he had joined the Ku Klux Klan once but had resigned and never rejoined.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1848, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Dickens is writing another Christmas story, and as [the] report goes, is to get 5,000 pounds for it. A handsome price, indeed.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1855, the Eagle reported, “The opinion expressed some weeks since, that a vote to restore the Missouri Compromise could not be obtained even in the lower House of Congress at the ensuing session, is now repeated by the Washington Star, which says, ‘It is understood by the well informed public men here that there will be a majority in the House of Representatives against in any manner interfering with the Nebraska act as it stands on the statute book.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1872, an Eagle editorial stated, “It is one of the incidents of our politics, that great men in their life are the property, and at their death are apt to become the legacy, of a single party. As long as they are alive, one half of their countrymen are appealed to honor them, while the other half are invited to defeat them … Men this afternoon are trying to do broader and better justice than this to the career and character of him who yesterday was the most eminent of living Americans. William H. Seward was probably liked and disliked and respected more than any man of his time. Now that he is dead, folks are really perplexed to find out whether it is a posthumous charity or a just estimate that causes them to consider him to have been the first statesman and politician of his day … [We remember him] as the New Yorker who for two generations, in his pure career, vindicated the claim of the Empire State to the possession of one of the very few great men of the earth.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1904, the Eagle reported, “It now looks as if Commissioner of Bridges [George] Best would more than make good his promise to operate cars across the Williamsburg Bridge on the 1st of November. The first trolley car to pass over the huge structure crossed this morning, from the plaza in old Williamsburg to Clinton street, Manhattan … It event looks now as if the Williamsburg Bridge might beat that other artificial thoroughfare, the subway, and have its passenger cars in operation in a fortnight. The tracks for the B.R.T. and the shuttle service, which occupy the south side of the bridge, have all been laid and bonded. The trolley wire is in place and alive along one of these tracks, and the other trolley and feed wires are rapidly being swung into place.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1926, the Eagle reported, “Essex Falls, N.J., Oct. 11 — Johnny Sylvester sat in the presence of his hero, Babe Ruth, today and was too overcome to speak. Johnny is 11 years old, the son of Horace C. Sylvester Jr., vice president of the National City Company in New York City. He is the lucky boy who was drawn back from the shadows of death last week when Ruth and other Yankee and Cardinal players paused long enough in the World Series to send him autographed baseballs. The autographed balls did what medicine alone could not do for the little hero worshipper, and a visit from the Babe today went a long way toward completing the treatment.”

 


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