Brooklyn Boro

MILESTONES: September 24, birthdays for Nia Vardalos, Kevin Sorbo, Ash Carter

September 24, 2018 Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Nia Vardalos. Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

ON THIS DAY IN 1905, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “An agreement was reached today on the terms for the dissolution of the union on Norway and Sweden. The understanding was arrived at during the final session of the delegates, which lasted more than three hours. On the reassembling of the delegates some point of disagreement developed, and they were still in conference at 5 p.m. A rumor spread soon after the delegates reassembled to the effect that an agreement had been signed and this was telegraphed to Christiania, but these were countermanded. The conference is terminated. It is officially announced that a full agreement was reached and signed at 6:10 p.m. The protocols will be published next week at Christiania and Stockholm simultaneously.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1915, the Eagle reported, “Dr. M. Simbad Gabriel, president of the Armenian General Progressive Association in the United States, has received from Nubar Pasha, diplomatic representative in Paris of the Katholikos, or head of the Armenian Church, advices in regard to the massacres of Armenians in Turkey, in which it is stated that ‘Christian martyrdom has at no time assumed such colossal proportions.’ The letters containing the advices were received by Nubar Pasha from ‘authoritative sources’ in Constantinople and Athens, and contain an appeal to the United States ‘to intercede and stop the persecutions.’ Dr. Gabriel, in making public the letters today, said that from information contained in them and from other reports he had received directly, he estimated that 450,000 Armenians had been put to death and 600,000 rendered homeless or exiled, out of a population of 1,500,000.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “Interest in the Grand Jury investigation into alleged ‘throwing’ of baseball games by dishonest players switched today from Chicago to Cleveland. With the Grand Jury adjourned until next Tuesday, investigators, baseball magnates and fans are watching the White Sox, for their victory or defeat in the series with the league leading Indians at Cleveland may decide the future course of the investigation. If the White Sox win today they will displace Cleveland and lead the league by half a game. Ban Johnson, president of the American League, is reported to have received rumors that gamblers are trying to create an impression that the White Sox do not dare win the league pennant. According to statements quoting Mr. Johnson … the syndicate of gamblers which, it has been charged, ‘bought’ last year’s World Series by paying $100,000 to five White Sox players, threatens to expose the plot if the Chicago team wins the race.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1939, the Eagle reported, “London, Sept. 23 (U.P.) – Sigmund Freud, world-famous founder of psychoanalysis, died shortly before midnight tonight. He was 83. Freud came to England from Vienna as a refugee after Germany took over Austria and instituted anti-Semitic measures there. He had been in poor health for months and in recent weeks became steadily weaker. He died in his home in Hempstead.  Freud was born in Vienna and for more than 30 years prior to Anschluss had been one of its most celebrated citizens. A frail wisp of a man, he saw the Nazis come in March, 1938, with misgivings. His passport was taken, his fortune impounded, his books burned and his publishing house destroyed. The man whose mind had influenced the thinking of the world was told that psychoanalysis was alien to Nazi philosophy. His reply was, ‘I suppose it is.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “London, Sept. 24 (U.P.) – [Soviet] Premier Josef Stalin said today he does not believe there is danger of a new war, but urged that the atom bomb be outlawed. Stalin revealed his optimistic personal views on relations between Russia and the Western world in a series of exceptionally frank answers to questions submitted Sept. 17 by Alexander Werth, Moscow correspondent of the London Sunday Times. The exchange was broadcast by Radio Moscow … ‘I do not consider the atom bomb to be a serious power, as certain political persons are wont to think,’ the Soviet Premier said. ‘The atom bomb is meant to frighten the weak-nerved, but they cannot decide the fates of war since atom bombs are by no means sufficient for this purpose.’ Werth asked if Stalin considered the United States’ monopoly on the atom bomb a chief threat to peace. ‘Certainly monopolist possession of the secrets of the atomic bomb does create a threat,’ Stalin replied, ‘but at least two remedies exist against it: Monopolistic possession of the atomic bomb cannot last long, and use of the atomic bomb will be prohibited.’”

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NOTABLE PEOPLE born on this day include former U.S. Secretary of Defense ASH CARTER, who was born in 1954;  actor GORDON CLAPP, who was born in 1948; journalist and talk show host ALAN COLMES, who was born in 1950; twins and Olympic gymnasts PAUL HAMM and MORGAN HAMM, who were born in 1982; former baseball player RAFAEL PALMEIRO, who was born in 1964; actor KEVIN SORBO, who was born in 1958; and screenwriter and actress NIA VARDALOS, who was born in 1962.

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F. SCOTT FITZGERALD WAS BORN ON THIS DAY IN 1896. The short-story writer and novelist, author of “This Side of Paradise,” “The Great Gatsby” and “Tender Is the Night” and more, was born in St. Paul. Fitzgerald was a member of the Lost Generation of American artists and writers. To his daughter, he wrote, “All good writing is swimming under water and holding your breath.” He died in Hollywood in 1940.

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“60 MINUTES” PREMIERED ON THIS DAY IN 1968. TV’s longest-running primetime program, and the first news magazine offering in-depth investigative reports and profiles, was originally hosted by Harry Reasoner and Mike Wallace. The show’s correspondents have included Ed Bradley, Steve Kroft, Lesley Stahl, Morley Safer, Andy Rooney, Scott Pelley, Dan Rather, Diane Sawyer and Bob Simon. Tough interviewer Mike Wallace retired from the show in 2006.

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JOHN MARSHALL WAS BORN ON THIS DAY IN 1755. The fourth chief justice of the U.S. was born in Virginia. He served in the House of Representatives and as secretary of state under John Adams. Appointed by President Adams to the position of chief justice in January 1801, he became known as “the Great Chief Justice.” Marshall’s court was largely responsible for defining the role of the Supreme Court and basic organizing principles of government in the early years after adoption of the Constitution in such cases as Marbury v Madison, McCulloch v Maryland, Cohens v Virginia and Gibbons v Ogden. He died in Philadelphia in 1835.

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NIRVANA RELEASED “NEVERMIND” ON THIS DAY IN 1991. The grunge rock group released this groundbreaking album — their second — on this date. Riding the popularity of its lead single, “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” “Nevermind” became the first alternative rock album to break into mainstream success, unseating Michael Jackson’s “Dangerous” as number one album by January 1992. The album has sold more than 26 million copies.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

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“The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function.” — F. Scott Fitzgerald, who was born on this day in 1896

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