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MILESTONES: July 16, birthdays for Gareth Bale, Luke Hemmings, James Maslow

July 16, 2018 Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Gareth Bale. AP Photo/Sergei Grits
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Greetings, Brooklyn.  Today is the 197th day of the year.

On this day in 1927, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Every beach, it seems, has its own ideas about what’s proper and what isn’t proper for bathing attire. Coney Island, of course, with its special laws, is most rigid. Old-fashioned to be exact. Legally, it’s a crime to wear the new bathing suits at Coney Island. Fashion this season dictates the boyish bathing suit, with flannel trunks and the blouse tucked inside. Not for Coney’s fair beach, however. Immoral, the police say. Manhattan and Brighton beaches are more lenient. The new suits are considered perfectly all right — but the management hasn’t reached the point yet where they rent that kind of suit. And Manhattan Beach is fussy about white bathing suits. Any other color under the sun — pink, red, green or purple — is quite the thing. But if you dare to step forth on Manhattan’s private beach with a nice white suit – no matter how heavy the material — off you go.”

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On this day in 1881, the Eagle reported, “The fighting that took place in front of the main stand at the Brighton race track yesterday was in the highest degree disgraceful to all who participated in it. The display of pistols and the effusion of blood before the eyes of hundreds of ladies constituted a spectacle of ruffianism of which the provocation alleged is no extenuation.”

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On this day in 1883, the Eagle reported, “The death of General Tom Thumb … of apoplexy, which occurred yesterday morning at his residence in Middleboro, Massachusetts, will cause a general feeling of regret. He was 45 years old and for 40 years he had been the favorite phenomenon of the American public. By the right of being a phenomenon he had also stood before kings, had sat upon the knee of the fat king of the French, Louis Philippe, and had been led by the hand by Queen Victoria, who showed him the treasures of Windsor Castle, which he assured her majesty were all ‘first class.’ … Tom Thumb saw much more of the world during his 45 years of residence in it than ordinary men do, even if they live to twice his age.”

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On this day in 1922, the Eagle reported, “In a neck and neck struggle which was not decided until John Black of San Francisco and Bobby Jones of Atlanta finished the last hole, Eugene Sarazen, the young golf professional from the Highlands Club, Pittsburgh, with a dazzling final round of 68, won the national open golf championship this afternoon at the Skokie Country Club by the margin of one stroke … [T]he new national open champion is a short, chunky youth of 22, whose dark complexion and hair denote his Italian descent. He grew up as a boy in Rye, N.Y. and learned golf as a caddy at the Apawamis Golf Club there.”

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On this day in 1925, the Eagle reported, “Action was taken by the Citizens Union in the Manhattan Supreme Court today to enjoin the further operation of WNYC, the New York City radio station, and “if necessary to close down the station altogether,” so as to keep it from being used for the spread of personal and political propaganda by Mayor [John] Hylan. This was done when Henry Fletcher, vice president of the union, through Leonard Wallstein, its counsel, brought a taxpayers’ suit asking for an injunction against WNYC. Justice McGoldrick signed an order to show cause, returnable on Monday, why the application should not be granted … The entire operation of the radio station, the plaintiff declares, is “nothing short of a scandal which threatens to grow increasingly serious as the time approaches for the designation of mayoralty candidates.”

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On this day in 1943, the Eagle reported, “Washington, July (UP) — President [Franklin] Roosevelt and Prime Minister [Winston] Churchill today served on the Italian people a life-or-death demand that they overthrow their leaders and make peace or suffer the consequences of invasion and total war at home. ‘Die for Mussolini and Hitler — or live for Italy, and for civilization.’ That was the keynote of the message carried to Italians by all available United Nations radio stations as millions of pamphlets, bearing the ultimatum, were dropped by Allied air forces over the length and breadth of the Italian peninsula … The message emphasized that the air over Italy is dominated by vast numbers of Allied planes. They were dropping pamphlets today, but it could be blockbusters tomorrow.”

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NOTABLE PEOPLE born on this day include soccer player GARETH BALE, who was born in 1989; singer and actor RUBEN BLADES, who was born in 1948; actress PHOEBE CATES, who was born in 1963; composer and musician STEWART COPELAND, who was born in 1952; actor COREY FELDMAN, who was born in 1971; comedian and actor WILL FERRELL, who was born in 1967; dancer MICHAEL FLATLEY, who was born in 1958; singer LUKE HEMMINGS, who was born in 1996; actor MARK INDELICATO, who was born in 1994; singer JAMES MASLOW, who was born in 1990; actress JAYMA MAYS, who was born in 1979; former football player BARRY SANDERS, who was born in 1968; and violinist PINCHAS ZUKERMAN, who was born in 1948.

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BARBARA STANWYCK WAS BORN ON THIS DAY IN 1907. Actress Barbara Stanwyck was born Ruby Stevens in Flatbush. At the age of 18 she won a leading role in the Broadway melodrama Noose, appearing for the first time as Barbara Stanwyck. She appeared in 82 films including “Stella Dallas,” “Double Indemnity” and “The Lady Eve” and in the television series “The Big Valley.” In 1944, the government listed her as the nation’s highest-paid woman, earning $400,000 per year. Stanwyck died in Santa Monica in 1990.

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THE ATOMIC BOMB WAS TESTED ON THIS DAY IN 1945. In the New Mexican desert at Alamogordo Air Base, 125 miles southeast of Albuquerque, the experimental atomic bomb was set off at 5:30 a.m. Dubbed “Fat Boy” by its creator, the plutonium bomb vaporized the steel scaffolding holding it as the immense fireball rose 8,000 feet in a fraction of a second — ultimately creating a mushroom cloud to a height of 41,000 feet. At ground zero, the bomb emitted heat three times the temperature of the interior of the sun. All plant and animal life for a mile around ceased to exist. When informed by President Harry Truman at Potsdam, Germany, of the successful experiment, Winston Churchill responded, “It’s the Second Coming in wrath!”

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IDA B. WELLS WAS BORN ON THIS DAY IN 1862. The African-American journalist and anti-lynching crusader was born the daughter of slaves and grew up as Jim Crow and lynching were becoming prevalent. Wells argued that lynchings occurred not to defend white women, but because of whites’ fear of economic competition from blacks. She traveled extensively, founding anti-lynching societies and black women’s clubs. Wells’ “Red Record” was one of the first published accounts of lynchings in the South. She died in 1931 in Chicago.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library. 

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“The way to right wrongs is to turn the light of truth upon them.” ― journalist Ida B. Wells-Barnett, who was born on this day in 1862

 


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