Brooklyn Boro

MILESTONES: June 22, birthdays for Elizabeth Warren, Kurt Warner, Carson Daly

June 22, 2018 Brooklyn Daily Eagle
U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren. AP Photo/Elise Amendola

Greetings, Brooklyn.  Today is the 172nd day of the year.

On this day in 1950, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The 1950 all-star game at Comiskey Park, Chicago, July 11 will be broadcast over the Mutual Radio network of the National Broadcasting Co., baseball commissioner A.B. Chandler announced today. The broadcast will be carried by 520 Mutual stations in the U.S. and Canada while the NBC telecast will go to 32 stations plus Mutual TV outlets in New York, Washington, Chicago and Boston.”

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On this day in 1863, the Eagle reported, “Harrisburg, June 21 – “A dispatch has been received to the effect that the rebels are advancing on Gettysburg with a force of 40,000 men and 18 pieces of artillery.”

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On this day in 1910, the Eagle reported from Dusseldorf, Germany, “The first regular airship passenger service was inaugurated today when Count Zeppelin’s great craft, the Deutschland, carrying 20 passengers, successfully made the first scheduled trip from Friedrichshafen to this city, a distance of 300 miles, in nine hours. The weather was perfect and the motors worked faultlessly … Count Zeppelin was at the helm when the Deutschland rose at Friedrichshafen at 3 o’clock this morning and sailed away on the trip that was to mark an epoch in aviation.”

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On this day in 1911, the Eagle reported from London, “King George V, eighth of the house of Hanover, was today consecrated to the service of the British Empire and in turn received the public homage of his world-wide subjects. With his consort, Queen Mary, his majesty was crowned in the Abbey of Westminster with all the wealth of religious rites and royal ceremonial prescribed by historic custom … Outside the usually dull streets had been transformed into a mass of color. The King and Queen’s progress to the Abbey and the return to Buckingham Palace was one unbroken ovation … The tumult of thunderous welcome was almost deafening as the King and Queen passed on the outward and homeward journeys.”

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On this day in 1913, the Eagle reported, “It was Yale pluck against Harvard doggedness yesterday afternoon at Ebbets Field, when the Blue and the Crimson met in the final battle of their three-game championship series, and a crowd of nearly fifteen thousand persons saw the sons of John Harvard win out in a game that was practically anybody’s until the last ball had been pitched. Not in years had Brooklyn seen so gay a gathering and so keen a contest as was brought out by this, the first intercollegiate baseball game at the new home of the Brooklyn Baseball Club, and the first game in years in the borough in which the opposing teams represented the biggest universities of the East.”

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On this day in 1916, the Eagle reported from Washington, “No reason for a change in policy toward Mexico is seen by the Washington government in Mexican accounts of the clash at Carrizal yesterday between American and Carranza troops. Until a report comes from General Pershing, there will be no decision, but President Wilson is said to view the fight as an incident for which subordinate commanders were probably responsible, and not as an act likely to precipitate general hostilities.” In Brooklyn, it was reported, “A bugle echoed loudly through the big armory of the First Cavalry, Union and President streets, at just 6:45 o’clock this morning. There was a prancing of restless horses, the quick swing of khaki-clad troopers into saddles, and then two long lines of horsemen stood at attention. A few minutes later, the bugle sounded again. This time, the big gate on the Union Street side of the armory swung open.”

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On June 24, 1908, the Eagle reported from Princeton, “Grover Cleveland, former president of the United States, died suddenly at his home at Westland here at 8:40 o’clock in the morning.  Death was due to heart failure complicated with other diseases … It is believed that the terrific heat of the last few days contributed in a great degree to the sudden death of Cleveland … Among the telegrams sent by Mrs. Cleveland to relatives and friends were one to President Roosevelt and one to Secretary of War Taft … Mayor McClellan ordered the City Hall flags to be flown at half-mast.”

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NOTABLE PEOPLE born on this day include basketball coach and former player DARRELL ARMSTRONG, who was born in 1968; actor KLAUS MARIA BRANDAUER, who was born in 1944; actress AMY BRENNEMAN, who was born in 1964; author DAN BROWN, who was born in 1964; mixed martial artist RANDY COUTURE, who was born in 1963; TV host and radio personality CARSON DALY, who was born in 1973; basketball coach and Hall of Fame player CLYDE DREXLER, who was born in 1962; U.S. Sen. DIANNE FEINSTEIN, who was born in 1933; singer and actor KRIS KRISTOFFERSON, who was born in 1936; actor MICHAEL LERNER, who was born in Brooklyn in 1941; actress TRACY POLLAN, who was born in 1960; singer and producer TODD RUNDGREN, who was born in 1948; Oscar Award-winning actress MERYL STREEP, who was born in 1949; former football player KURT WARNER, who was born in 1971; actress LINDSAY WAGNER, who was born in 1949; and U.S. Sen. ELIZABETH WARREN, who was born in 1949.

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ED BRADLEY WAS BORN ON THIS DAY IN 1941. The TV journalist’s career began with battlefield reporting as he covered the fall of Saigon, and he was the first African-American TV correspondent to cover the White House. He spent his entire career with CBS and worked on the venerable “60 Minutes” for 26 years. Highly respected for his journalistic integrity, he earned 19 Emmy Awards and four George Peabody Awards in the course of his career. Bradley died in 2006 in New York.

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JOSEPH PAPP WAS BORN ON THIS DAY IN 1921. The Brooklyn-born American theater figure is best known for his work with New York Public Theater. At its helm, Papp produced a wide range of works from the classical to that of the newest American dramatists, including “Hair,” “Two Gentlemen of Verona,” “The Pirates of Penzance,” “The Mystery of Edwin Drood,” “That Championship Season” and “A Chorus Line.” He began in 1954 with the Shakespeare Theatre Workshop, taking touring productions around the city on a flatbed truck. When the truck broke down in Central Park, Papp turned his touring company into Shakespeare in the Park. Producing and directing more than 400 productions, Papp garnered three Pulitzer Prizes, six New York Critics Circle Awards and 28 Tonys. He died in New York in 1991.

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BILLY WILDER WAS BORN ON THIS DAY IN 1906. After a short career in Berlin, Wilder fled Germany in 1933 and eventually landed in Hollywood, where he directed and co-wrote some of the 20th century’s foremost films. His classics include the film noir works “Double Indemnity” and “Sunset Boulevard,” the searing dramas “Stalag 17” and “The Lost Weekend,” and the comic “Some Like it Hot.” He received six Oscars (out of 21 nominations), and Best Film Oscars went to “The Lost Weekend” and “The Apartment.” Wilder died in Los Angeles in 2002.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

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“If you don’t have a seat at the table, you’re probably on the menu.” — U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who was born on this day in 1949

 

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