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Brooklyn honors MLK at first annual March of Peace

Pols Praise the Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at Preschool

January 17, 2017 By John Alexander Brooklyn Daily Eagle
From left: Pre-K teacher Carol Bussitil, District 20 Chair Dianne Gounardes, state Assemblymember Pamela Harris, Deputy Brooklyn Borough President Diana Reyna, John Quaglione, assistant principal Lauren Napolitano,paraprofessional Joviece Robinson, school assistant Camille Loccisano and teacher Lenice Prince pose with pre-K students. Eagle photos by Arthur De Gaeta

In anticipation of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, District 20’s (including Bay Ridge, Dyker Heights, Bensonhurst) Pre-K Center Z075, located on Bay 11th Street, hosted a successful March of Peace celebrating the legacy of Dr. King. Parents and families of the children, along with state Assemblymember Pamela Harris; Brooklyn Deputy Borough President Diana Reyna; John Quaglione, representing state Sen. Marty Golden; and Angelina Dahab, representing City Councilmember Vincent Gentile, all joined in the festivities.

The event began with an outdoor march as the children held banners citing some of Dr. King’s most important messages. After the march, the children sang and recited inspirational music and poems.

The event was inspired by the shared goals of the Pre-K for All program of District 20, as the little learners are taught Dr. King’s values of peaceful communication and to treat all people with equal respect.

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Introduced by Mayor Bill de Blasio and Chancellor Carmen Fariña, Universal Pre-K for All educates New York City children in the 4-year-old pre-school age group. Led by Early Childhood Director Dianne Gounardes, nine pre-K centers are located in District 20 that serve approximately 1,200 families.

Gounardes expressed her thoughts on the event saying, “I am so proud of our children at District 20 Pre-K Center Z075 at 21 Bay 11th St. for today’s celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s life and legacy. It is clear to me that in order to effect change, we must begin by teaching our youngest learners so that they will grow up understanding and living the tenets of Dr. King’s dream. Dr. King once said, ‘Even if I knew that tomorrow the world would go to pieces, I would still plant my apple tree.’ Today we planted that apple tree seed — the seed that will promote peace and understanding. We will cultivate it and watch it grow and multiply until we truly have peace throughout the world.”

 


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