Downtown Brooklyn

Brooklyn loses to Philly in bid to host DNC

February 13, 2015 Anna Spivak
Share this:

Democrats will not be saying “Hello Brooklyn” in 2016.

The party has settled on Philadelphia as the site for the next Democratic National Convention, although Brooklyn was in the running as one of three finalists.

“You have to dream big to be big, and no one dreams bigger than Brooklyn,” said Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams upon hearing the news. “Our pursuit of hosting the 2016 Democratic National Convention was a valiant pursuit that made us stronger and more united as a borough. Brooklynites also benefitted from the national platform to tell our story of diversity, innovation and resilience, a story that makes us the most vibrant place on the planet.”

The convention is held every four years by the Democratic Party in order to select and confirm candidates for both president and vice president.

Subscribe to the Brooklyn Eagle

Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Carlo Scissura also commented on the choice and said that the Brooklyn Chamber was “disappointed” that the convention will not be held in Brooklyn this year.

“The DNC would have provided a tremendous boost to our borough’s economy, but Brooklyn is already booming anyway,” said Scissura. “A Junior’s cheesecake or Villabate cannoli still beat a Philly cheesesteak any day, so I urge the delegates and visitors to take the short train ride to Brooklyn during the convention to experience everything we have to offer.”

Mayor Bill de Blasio held a press conference on February 12 to address the loss and spoke about how the city came together in an effort to win.

“We knew this would be a tough, tough, fight and we gave our all,” said de Blasio. “People all over the city participated. We got a great outpouring of support from elected officials, community leaders, the business community, the labor community [and] I could not be prouder of that effort.

“I really do believe that a convention in Brooklyn would have sent a great message about what this country has historically been and can be in the future, an inclusive place, an open place, a place for everyone,” he continued, “a place where immigrants are welcomed and acknowledged as the source of our strength. This is the Brooklyn story and though we didn’t prevail, we got to tell that story for the last year.”


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment