Vinegar Hill

The Top Ten Coolest Places in Vinegar Hill

December 10, 2014 By Lore Croghan Brooklyn Daily Eagle
The eye-catching house on the corner is 70 Hudson Ave. To its left, 72 Hudson Ave. is the building where beguiling restaurant Vinegar Hill House is located. Eagle photos by Lore Croghan

Eye On Real Estate

Branch out beyond DUMBO.

There’s eye candy aplenty right next door in Vinegar Hill. Walk a few extra blocks on the cobblestone streets and see it.

And when you’re ready for an additional adventure, walk a few blocks more to another neighborhood, Bridge Plaza. If you’re not quite sure where it is, see our story about 167 Concord St., the Bridge Plaza house that draws lots of photographers.

We’ve loved DUMBO since our first encounter two decades ago. We will adore it forever — no matter how pricey its condos become, or how long the lines get at Brooklyn Roasting Co. on Jay Street. But a change of scenery is a good thing once in a while.

So back to Vinegar Hill. This is really just a sampling of the cool places in the neighborhood:

1. The Commandant’s House stands tall on Evans Street — see related story.

2. The pre-Civil War, Greek Revival townhouse at 69 Gold St. has been extensively renovated and is for sale, with a $3.4 million asking price and Douglas Elliman Real Estate as its broker. “Twilight” heartthrob Robert Pattinson gave the landmarked property a look, the New York Post recently reported.

3. Vinegar Hill House is a beguiling restaurant at 72 Hudson Ave. It serves superb squash ravioli and the best Brussels sprouts ever. The low-key charm of its décor and its menu will soothe your soul. The place gets bonus points for having Bob Dylan’s “Tangled Up In Blue” and Neil Young’s “Only Love Can Break Your Heart”on the sound system’s play list.

4. The row of houses, 49 to 59 Hudson Ave., from Plymouth to Evans streets, gives us an intense sense of stepping far, far back into the past. The city Landmarks Preservation Commission designation report for Vinegar Hill says 49 Hudson Ave. was built in 1835 or earlier.

5. The landmarked 1908-vintage former Benjamin Moore paint factory at 231-233 Front St. was turned into an office building.

6. The pre-Civil War rowhouses at 237 to 249 Front St., next to the former Benjamin Moore factory, are understated homes of brick, brownstone and stucco — dignified without being stuffy.

7. The Dorje Ling Buddhist Center at 98 Gold St., painted glowing yellow, has flags snapping in the wind. The focus there is the Jonang Tradition of Tibetan Buddhism.

8. Bridge Coffee Shop at 73 Bridge St., with a bi-cultural Hispanic and American menu, will feed you well with lunch specials starting at $5.50. And nobody will laugh at you if you speak Spanish like a gringo.

9. The house at 324 Plymouth St., with weathered paint on the side of it, is so picturesque.

10. On Front Street near the corner of Hudson Avenue, there’s a witty-looking sculpture on a street-sign post. It’s a giant human face made of old machine parts, brush bristles and various found objects.

11.  BONUS ITEM: The intersection of John and Gold streets is a grand place to stand if you’re missing Midtown Manhattan. When night falls, the Empire State Building and skyscrapers near it can be seen through a Con Ed facility’s fence.

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