Downtown

New legal center to assist Brooklyn entrepreneurs

November 20, 2013 By Charisma L. Miller, Esq. Brooklyn Daily Eagle
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When Nick Allard took over as the president and dean of Brooklyn Law School in 2012, he was determined to expand on Brooklyn’s entrepreneurial trend and expressed hopes to create business boot camps that would allow law students to assist Brooklyn’s start-up business owners in forming corporate structures and preparing organizational documents.  

You cannot “teach entrepreneurship,” Allard told the Brooklyn Daily Eagle in his inaugural interview, but “[law schools] can provide the tools.” Allard has followed through on his goal, creating Business Boot Camps in partnership with Deloitte and announcing the opening of BLS’ CUBE (Center for Urban Business Entrepreneurship).

Designed as a vehicle to explore legal issues surrounding entrepreneurship, and for providing effective legal representation and support for new commercial and not-for-profit businesses – while also training the next generation of business lawyers to advise and participate in these sectors –CUBE hopes to further Brooklyn’s panache for innovation.

“Brooklyn has always been a place where great ideas are born and nurtured, from the start of the American Revolution up to today’s Digital Revolution,” Allard said at CUBE’s Nov. 14 launch event. “CUBE will be a home for the next generation of revolutionaries, pioneers, entrepreneurs and leaders.”

BLS students participating in CUBE will take foundational courses on entrepreneurship and industry-specific courses, and engage in hands-on, skill-focused clinics with practicing attorneys—allowing students an opportunity to receive an entrepreneurship certificate with their law degree.

With locations at BLS, 55 Washington Street in DUMBO, and 15 MetroTech Center in Downtown Brooklyn, CUBE will present “powerful new opportunities centered on the role of law for emerging commercial and not-for-profit businesses,” Allard noted. “[CUBE] adds another component of our comprehensive curriculum for the 21st century.”