Park Slope Actress Anna Fikhman To Screen Film On November 19

November 12, 2012 Editorial Staff
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Born in Italy, and raised in Bay Ridge, 22-year-old Anna Fikhman will soon wow audiences  in a film called “Art Works,” screening on Monday, November 19 at 83 Mercer Street, in Manhattan.

In the movie — about Arthur Krupnik (a.k.a. Art), a conceptual artist on the verge of fame and celebrity — Fikhman plays a supporting character named Helena, who’s a Russian prostitute and dominatrix.

Directed by Hila Perry, the plot focuses mainly on a recent incident at Krupnik’s latest art show which drove him to question the integrity of his work, in which he tries to find ways to make his work meaningful and honest.

The Brooklynite, who currently resides in Park Slope, moved to Bay Ridge at the age  of three months along with her family. A graduate of Edward R. Murrow High School, she is now pursuing her acting career on a full-time basis.

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She graduated with honors from New York University-Tisch, obtaining her B.F.A in drama in December 2010, and received an “Excellence Award,” from Stonestreet Studios (TV & Film Acting Studio). Recently, the young actress has also been called in for 30 Rock and Elementary (a new Lucy Liu show).

Fikhman’s talent has opened many doors for her. She played a drug-addicted homeless girl named Roxy as well as her twin sister, Amy, a “high class escort,” in “Black & White,” directed by Michael Ray, coming in winter 2012; she has wrapped up a short film called “And That’s What I Call Love,” and presently is working on a music video “White Girl Wasted,” by Hila Perry, in which drunk fools in New York City are the main focus of attention.

If you would like to learn more about her, visit her website at: www.annafikhman.com, where she is described as “A witty, charming, unconventional blonde committed to creating inspiring, hilarious and honest characters.”

“She’s a professional actor with enormous talent,” Garry Bennett, from Stonestreet Studios says, contending that Fikhman’s “work is stellar,” as she shifts from the portrayal of one character to another. “It is really quite organic and astounding.”


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